Seattle takes a gamble on airport record store

Grant Tillery

There's much consensus about what does and does not belong in airports.  Food concessions generally do; creepy senators generally don't.  But record stores?  Apparently Seattle record label Sub Pop thinks so.

The purveyor of all things indie rock is opening a record shop in the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport this April.  It's going to be a full-service endeavor, open 365 days a year from 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.  This means you can buy Band of Horses records at ungodly hours of the morning.

Though novel, this concept is bound for failure.  For one, who the heck buys records at airports?  No one is carrying turntables or Walkmen with them on flights, instead opting for convenient, svelte cell phones as traveling companions.  All the songs likely available at Sub Pop's store can be purchased on iTunes at the airport without carrying the physical copy of the album home with you (then again, liner notes are a better read than the Jodi Picoult novel you brought for the plane ride).  Though business will be booming at the get go, thanks to the cachet of buying records at the airport, fliers will quickly realize that it's inconvenient to lug vinyl around on a plane, and that you can (likely) buy the same albums cheaper at record stores.