U delivers on Maroon and Gold Day

By Brett Angel

People who know how many underground buildings there are on campus, which school other than Minnesota claims the gopher as its official mascot, or even whether Goldy is male or female, would have a chance to win the University’s new “Know Your ‘U'” trivia contest at the Minnesota State Fair.

Minnesotans with an above-average knowledge of University fun facts took home Goldy bobbleheads from the fair, which celebrated Maroon and Gold Day on Sunday.

The University’s involvement at the State Fair has grown in recent years, and the institution continues to add its own flavor to the sights, sounds, smells and tastes Minnesotans experience at the fairgrounds.

Adjacent to the University’s stage, which hosts an assortment of demonstrations, performances and contests throughout the 12-day festival, is a building also occupied by the University. Inside, patrons can get information about the school’s colleges, buy merchandise, view sports highlight videos and buy tickets for athletic events.

“It’s been very successful,” said the University’s director of events and special projects Nina Shepherd, of the school’s involvement at the fair.

“This is a chance for us to reach a lot of people that normally wouldn’t come to campus. It’s a very different audience,” she said.

The University-sponsored Miracle of Birth Center, was one of the fair’s biggest attractions last year.

The exhibit, co-hosted by the University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, the Minnesota Veterinary Medical Association and the Future Farmers of America, provides fair-goers with the opportunity to witness live births of lambs, calves and piglets.

Veterinarians use controlled breeding techniques to increase the probability the animals will give birth sometime during the fair.

“We cheat,” said Dr. Walter Mackey, official veterinarian of the fair, who graduated as part of CVM’s first class in 1951.

There’s no schedule of events posted outside the exhibit, but as of Sunday more than 80 animals had already been born in front of the live audience.

“This exhibit has been an amazing success,” said Mackey. “People don’t get to see this very often, except on TV once in a while.”

The exhibit is also a good venue for teaching, said Florian Ledermann, the event’s co-chairman. He said CVM students participate as part of their education.

The State Fair has become the University’s largest annual special event, with close to 2 million people expected to make their way through the fairgrounds this year.

Shepherd, who has coordinated the University’s participation at the fair for the past three years, said it takes nearly six months of preparation to get everything ready.

While an event such as Mark Yudof’s farewell sendoff in July attracted approximately 6,000 people, Shepherd said more than that number visit the University areas at the fair each day.

“It’s a lot of work, but the most rewarding thing is seeing the smiles on people’s faces,” Shepherd said. “I get a huge sense of pride from that.”

People who know how many underground buildings there are on campus, which school other than Minnesota claims the gopher as its official mascot, or even whether Goldy is male or female, would have a chance to win the University’s new “Know Your ‘U'” trivia contest at the Minnesota State Fair.

Minnesotans with an above-average knowledge of University fun facts took home Goldy bobbleheads from the fair, which celebrated Maroon and Gold Day on Sunday.

The University’s involvement at the State Fair has grown in recent years, and the institution continues to add its own flavor to the sights, sounds, smells and tastes Minnesotans experience at the fairgrounds.

Adjacent to the University’s stage, which hosts an assortment of demonstrations, performances and contests throughout the 12-day festival, is a building also occupied by the University. Inside, patrons can get information about the school’s colleges, buy merchandise, view sports highlight videos and buy tickets for athletic events.

“It’s been very successful,” said the University’s director of events and special projects Nina Shepherd, of the school’s involvement at the fair.

“This is a chance for us to reach a lot of people that normally wouldn’t come to campus. It’s a very different audience,” she said.

The University-sponsored Miracle of Birth Center, was one of the fair’s biggest attractions last year.

The exhibit, co-hosted by the University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, the Minnesota Veterinary Medical Association and the Future

Farmers of America, provides fair-goers with the opportunity to witness live births of lambs, calves and piglets.

Veterinarians use controlled breeding techniques to increase the probability the animals will give birth sometime during the fair.

“We cheat,” said Dr. Walter Mackey, official veterinarian of the fair, who graduated as part of CVM’s first class in 1951.

There’s no schedule of events posted outside the exhibit, but as of Sunday more than 80 animals had already been born in front of the live audience.

“This exhibit has been an amazing success,” said Mackey. “People don’t get to see this very often, except on TV once in a while.”

The exhibit is also a good venue for teaching, said Florian Ledermann, the event’s co-chairman. He said CVM students participate as part of their education.

The State Fair has become the University’s largest annual special event, with close to 2 million people expected to make their way through the fairgrounds this year.

Shepherd, who has coordinated the University’s participation at the fair for the past three years, said it takes nearly six months of preparation to get everything ready.

While an event such as Mark Yudof’s farewell sendoff in July attracted approximately 6,000 people, Shepherd said more than that number visit the University areas at the fair each day.

“It’s a lot of work, but the most rewarding thing is seeing the smiles on people’s faces,” Shepherd said. “I get a huge sense of pride from that.”