As weird as weird gets

Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti blows out the bizarre-o-meter

PHOTO COURTESY ARIEL PINK

Ashley Goetz

PHOTO COURTESY ARIEL PINK

WHAT: Ariel PinkâÄôs Haunted Graffiti with Duchess Says and Haunted House WHERE: Triple Rock Social Club, 629 Cedar Ave. S. WHEN: 10 p.m. Friday Mar. 27, TICKETS: $12 18+ www.triplerocksocialclub.com Ariel PinkâÄôs music has been called many things: Avant-garde, performance art, freak-folk and experimental pop, just to name a few. The musician and self-recording aficionadoâÄôs live shows have been met by audiences with a mix of wonder and contempt. His concerts have been labeled train wrecks âÄî venues often empty out within the first 30 minutes of his taking the stage. This love or hate reaction is part of what makes this California nativeâÄôs weird croon and unrehearsed lo-fi dreamy garage sound so hard to pin down. When Pink does rope in supporters, they often have impressive résumés themselves. His reminiscent montage-like pop hum enchanted BaltimoreâÄôs Animal Collective so much that they sought him out for their Paw Tracks record label, releasing and re-releasing a number of his recordings as Ariel PinkâÄôs Haunted Graffiti since 2003. Jimi Hey of Beachwood Sparks and The Rapture has also expressed die-hard fandom for the eccentric Pink. Amidst the buzz surrounding rumors of a new full-length album and with a massive international tour already in process, Ariel PinkâÄôs Haunted Graffiti seems to have been injected with a jolt of energy. Audiences still cringe at the unpolished nature of PinkâÄôs approach to music, since his songs are almost always unpracticed prior to shows. Pink stated in an interview on the Australian television program âÄúIn the Raw,âÄú that he often self-records until he can find something that he likes, recollecting and overlaying his ideas until he has melded himself a bizarre finished product. In the past, Pink had enlisted a rotating cast of musicians to back him in each new city, soliciting and commissioning people via e-mail to play with him as part of Haunted Graffiti. A search for the artist on YouTube renders a number of shimmering Super 8-filmed, pre-MTV-ish music videos, so strange and uncannily reminiscent of forgotten A/V eras that itâÄôs impossible to find indicators of the present. This is the vein that runs most prevalently throughout PinkâÄôs work: an inability to pinpoint its place in time. PinkâÄôs songs donâÄôt recall a different period. The sound isnâÄôt revivalist or reminiscent of any one genre or motif. Instead, it exists as a beautiful, eerie hodgepodge âÄî themes and times both futuristic and nostalgic, all existing together in a beautiful lo-fi scheme.