New Minneapolis rock group Tights is playing around town

New Minneapolis rock group Tights is playing around town

Shannon Bee, Stephanie Murck, Chloe Carson and Liz Coombs of the band Tights pose for a portrait on Monday, Oct. 3, 2016 in Minneapolis.

Meagan Lynch

Shannon Bee, Stephanie Murck, Chloe Carson and Liz Coombs of the band Tights pose for a portrait on Monday, Oct. 3, 2016 in Minneapolis.

Joe Cristo

The members of Tights are Minneapolis music royalty. Each has been in some popular local project over the past few years, including Tony Peachka, royal brat, and Cherry Cola. Now, they’ve banded together to create a new “supergroup.”

Chloe Carson and Stephanie Jo Murck — both singers and guitarists for the gig — usually write songs about self-image issues and “nice boys.” The band was established this May.

“[Murck] and I were doing a lot of collaboration in the beginning,” Carson said. “Lately I’ve been writing a lot of songs alone, and to be honest I don’t want it that way.”

Tights’ sound fits firmly within the Minneapolis poppy, punk-rock scene, but Carson also lists alt-rock heroes Veruca Salt and Motown girl groups as influences.

“I like Beat Happening,” said bassist Shannon Bee. “They were one of the first bands I heard that made me realize ‘Dang, I can make music, too.’”

Carson and Murck played together in a previous local band, but when that ended, they decided to start a group together.

“I met Chloe at the 7th St Entry for the Burger Record’s ‘Caravan of Stars,’” Murck said. “We danced together, and then I knew we would be friends.”

Carson and Murck soon brought in Bee on bass and Liz Coombs on drums.

Usually, Carson comes up with a song idea and writes a chord progression around it. Murck then helps nail down lyrics, filling in any unfinished sections. The remaining band members write their parts during practice.

“I’m most inspired by drummers who are innovative, but also have the ability to play what the song calls for,” Coombs said. “ … As opposed to just playing what they want to play.”

Sing-along choruses and a bend toward catchy song-writing are priorities for Tights, as well as a militant stance on inclusion and freedom from prototypical jock-rock leanings.

“I can’t help but feel inspired by music that compels me to sing along at the top of my lungs no matter what I am,” Bee said.

Tights is relatively new and has only played a few shows. That being said, each performance has been met with an enthusiastic response by local scenesters.

Their first show was a Black Lives Matter fundraiser at the DIY venue “Psychic School” with Omega Defender, Drapes and the Florists. Since then, the group has mostly played basements and a prime slot during Australian band Gooch Palms’ last visit to Minneapolis.

For now, Tights is focusing on playing live and extending their fan base. They are planning to tour and record next year.

“We haven’t really talked about [the future] as a group,” Carson said. “But my mom says when we ‘make it,’ and go on tour she wants to come on the bus with us and do our laundry.”