Student groups host concert in opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline

The American Indian Student Cultural Center organized the event which had five local artists perform.

Attendees enter the Whole Music Club for the Stand With Standing Rock benefit event on Nov. 28, 2016. The event was hosted to raise money and awareness for the Dakota Access Pipeline occupation happening in North Dakota.

Maddy Fox

Attendees enter the Whole Music Club for the Stand With Standing Rock benefit event on Nov. 28, 2016. The event was hosted to raise money and awareness for the Dakota Access Pipeline occupation happening in North Dakota.

Rilyn Eischens

Dozens of community members and University of Minnesota students gathered for a concert Monday night to raise money to fight the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Five local artists performed at the event, which was hosted by the American Indian Student Cultural Center and a few other student groups, at The Whole Music Club in Coffman Memorial Union.

Members of the community approached the AISCC and asked what they could do to help the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, said event organizer Summer Lara. The group had many ideas for fundraisers and combined them into a benefit concert, she said.

Concert attendees could donate money and supplies as well as purchase T-shirts and baked goods at the event. All proceeds will be given to Sacred Stone Camp, the main campsite for protesters, Lara said.

Fourth-year doctoral student Sasha María Suarez said she went to Standing Rock in September and attended the concert because she wanted to find more ways to help.

She said she wishes people were more aware of the tribal sovereignty and land ownership aspects of the situation.

“This is a deep-seeded issue,” she said.

Environmental science sophomore Anna Nelson said she attended the event because she wanted to get involved and show that she supports those fighting the pipeline.

She said she worries about pollution of the Missouri River.

“Water is such an important resource, and it’s not fair to take away someone’s water supply because you want to make a profit,” she said.

Thousands of demonstrators have gathered at Sacred Stone Camp in North Dakota since April to protest the pipeline’s construction. It passes within a half-mile of the Standing Rock Sioux reservation, raising concerns about environmental impact and protection of Native Americans’ land.

Editor’s note: A previous version of this article stated that all proceeds from the Stand with Standing Rock benefit concert would go to Standing Rock; however, since publication, the event organizers have decided to send the donations to the Standing Rock Medic and Healer Council and the legal defense fund.