GC transfer policy pushes students out

GC students with fewer than 60 credits should be grandfathered in, not kicked to the curb.

In just a few months the General College program will be phased into the College of Education and Human Development. In the meantime, Terry Collins, a man appointed by University President Bob Bruininks as the interim dean for the General College came up with a policy mandating that students with more than 60 credits be dispersed to the various other colleges.

Many from the General College program perhaps will find a place in the other colleges. But a population of students who have not met the 60-credit mark remains. The fate of students is a concern. Will these students be left without a place in the University or will they be given a chance?

The University has not adequately publicized what will happen to these students with less than 60 credits. They are being pressured into transferring or dropped from the University altogether. General College students with fewer than 60 credits should be grandfathered in, not kicked out.

Very little has been done to address the future of current General College students. Will students have access to the advising that the General College offered? Much of the current advising staff will not move on to the College of Education and Human Development.

Given this fact, itís crucial to pay attention to the resources that are being made available to future General College-caliber students. There needs to be strong communication within the University to ensure a smooth merging of the two colleges.

President Bruininks and Terry Collins should answer these questions. Current General College students should not have to leave the University because they failed to make the 60-credit cut. If they already are enrolled in the University, they should not be forced from it when the General College no longer exists.