Horny for laughs

Orny Adams loves doing standup, a very serious profession in his mind.

Spencer Doar

 

What: Orny Adams           

When: 7:30 p.m. Thursday, 7:30 and 9:45 p.m. Friday, 7 and 9:30 p.m. Saturday, 7 p.m. Sunday

Where: Rick Bronson’s House of Comedy, Level 4 East at the Mall of America

Cost: $15-$19

Ages: 18+

 

Orny Adams was riled up about the new Vine video app, making six-second video after video, complaining about its editing capabilities while still describing it with the playfulness of a kid on Christmas morn.

That’s what this comic is all about. He is constantly energetic, even while jet-lagged on three hours of sleep. He gets worked up over the material he presents, a sort of frenzied comedic messenger.

“I don’t ever put on a face; I get worked up about stuff, but I enjoy it,” Adams said. “People look at my act and say there’s such anger — there’s no anger, there’s love, there’s such a wink to camera when I’m up there, and I hope people recognize that.”

Adams, who can also be seen as Coach Finstock on MTV’s “Teen Wolf,” got an early boost a dozen years ago when he became acquainted with Jerry Seinfeld while he was working on his documentary “Comedian.”

Adams got a lot of screen time in that film, but he was just starting out at the time and occasionally came across like an overconfident ass. Given his beginner status at the time, the perception was that he conflated his own sense of worth without the track record to back it up.   

“I certainly do not feel the need to pound my chest and have the bravado I once had,” Adams said. “I just do great work, and if you like it, fine, if you don’t, okay.”

He’s anal retentive, saying that as a child he alphabetized his Halloween candy. Now, that continues in his writing method.

“I’m very organized, very systematic,” Adams said. “Other people are more jazzy — Dave Chappelle, Robin Williams —they’ll just riff on stage and see where it goes. I like to overwrite and boil it down.”

Besides his own standup, Adams busies himself with screenplays, scripts and occasionally writing jokes for others.

“Selfishly, I probably save most of the good stuff for myself and my standup,” Adams said. “I’d be hesitant to hire a working comedian to write jokes for me.”

As to what Adams is looking to illustrate: it’s all over the place, a reflection of his all-encompassing neuroses.

“I’m really caught up in the seven billion people on this planet and how we’re giving tax breaks to people with children,” Adams said. “I should be able to cut the UPC off my condom box and attach it to my 1040 for a refund.”

For all of his varying side projects, standup is his lady and will remain so for the time being.

“Everything else is just limbs out of a tree,” Adams said. “I don’t have the control and the freedom that I have on stage anywhere else. At the end of the day, there is nothing more gratifying than to tell a joke and seeing it land.”