Rybak and Coleman handily win back their seats

Rybak was highly favored for re-election and won 74 percent of votes.

Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak talks with press Tuesday evening at his election party at the Graves 601 hotel downtown.

Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak talks with press Tuesday evening at his election party at the Graves 601 hotel downtown.

Taryn Wobbema

With an overwhelming majority of first place votes, R.T. RybakâÄôs expected re-election was confirmed Tuesday night. With endorsements by all 13 city council members and numerous other elected officials, Rybak was highly favored for re-election and won 74 percent of the votes. MinneapolisâÄô new form of instant runoff voting pitted Rybak against 10 individuals, only one of which was endorsed by a major party. As is always the struggle in off-year elections, getting voters to the polls was difficult. Rybak spokesman Jeremy Hanson said the mayoral race lacked major competition, which likely contributed to the low turnout. âÄúYou have to remind people that they still have to go vote,âÄù Hanson said, adding Rybak canâÄôt just float into the position for another term just because heâÄôs well liked. Jake Breedlove and William Kaye, two University juniors, were voters number 19 and 20 at the Coffman Union precinct. Placing their vote just after 3 p.m., they said they knew not many students would be voting this year. Breedlove said he is a strong supporter of Rybak, whom he has interacted with on numerous occasions, including serving together as delegates to the Democratic National Convention last year. He said he thought more of what he referred to as the âÄúObama voting machineâÄù would have shown up to vote since Rybak was so supportive of the Obama campaign during last yearâÄôs race. John Kolstad, an Independent Civic Leader candidate endorsed by the Minneapolis Independent Party and the Minneapolis Republican Party, was considered RybakâÄôs most promising contender. Neither he nor his campaign staff was available for comment. Kolstad earned about 11 percent of first choice votes. Rybak said his primary focus in his next term will be âÄúcreating jobs and helping kids.âÄù He said he will continue to promote city employment programs as well as nurturing local businesses. âÄúRight now I think everyoneâÄôs got to be focused on creating jobs,âÄù he said. Rybak also talked about continuing work to decrease crime in Minneapolis. Citing transportation, a green economy and forward steps in biotechnology, he said there is a lot of work ahead. âÄúRight now, IâÄôve got to get back to work,âÄù he said. Getting back to work was also RybakâÄôs answer to questions of his anticipated gubernatorial campaign. He said it is likely he will run; however, he is stopping to âÄútake a breathâÄù and an official announcement will not likely be heard for another couple months. St. Paul results Receiving nearly 69 percent of the vote, St. Paul Mayor Chris Coleman easily won re-election over challenger Eva Ng Tuesday night. NgâÄôs campaign manager Jan Schneider said Ng and her supporters were disappointed in the results but âÄúit is what it is.âÄù