The style section

Super-popular fashion blogger The Sartorialist launches his first book.

PHOTO COURTESY PENGUIN

Ashley Goetz

PHOTO COURTESY PENGUIN

TITLE: âÄúThe SartorialistâÄù AUTHOR: Scott Schuman PUBLISHER: Penguin Press PRICE: $25.00 PAGES: 507 Scott Schuman, better known amongst the fashion set as the Sartorialist , has a knack for not only spotlighting glance-worthy ensembles, but for capturing the person behind the outfit. He can get more personality out of a subjectâÄôs pair of shoes or a leopard print scarf than anyone would ever imagine. His camera lens is so popular itâÄôs garnered the praises of Kanye West , Vogue Paris editor Carine Roitfeld and fellow fashion photographer Mario Testino . Anywhere the fashionable might be, so too is Schuman. Schuman worked in the fashion biz for a number of years before feeling something lacking, and turned to the streets for his inspiration. The Sartorialist, a photo blog in which the much traveled Schuman documents the costumes of those who catch his eye from Milan to Sweden to New York City, quickly became a sweeping phenomenon across the Internet and garnered Schuman the honor of being one of TIME magazineâÄôs Top 100 Design Influences . His camera lens has focused in on West, ELLE stylist and editor Kate Lanphear , fashion blogger Rumi of Fashion Toast and a kaleidoscope of others in between. It was only a matter of time before Schuman got a book deal, and much like the sharply tailored suits he favors, his collaboration with Penguin is nothing short of meticulous class. ItâÄôs small enough to lug around in a Louis Vuitton tote , but itâÄôs loaded enough to serve as inspiration for day-to-day dressing. âÄúThe SartorialistâÄù in book form is filled with favorites from the blog, which gets more than 125,000 visits per day, and played a huge role in the uprising of fashion blogs as a new medium to convey runway trends and their real-life interpretations. The celebrated SchumanâÄôs lens is highly discerning. He has a knack for zeroing in on the tiniest details that take an ensemble from presentable to astounding. ItâÄôs far from superficial. But his lens is more open when it comes to the folks he photographs. Though the girl gracing the cover is everything a street fashion newbie would expect to see, all skinny slouch and articulate prettiness, inside the pages are dotted with all types of individuals. Schuman takes pictures of the old, the young, the thin and the rotund. Sure, there are a fair amount of slender, lovely girls, but they take a backseat to inclusions like the Orthodox Jew, or the self-described âÄúbald, fat manâÄù who favors southern Italian tailoring. His photos garnered so many comments on âÄúThe SartorialistâÄù site from gentlemen of a similar body shape, clamoring for the name of his tailor or advice on how to mimic his look. Another anecdote included in the book is a photo Schuman took of a man many of his readers (and a gallery owner) assumed was a homeless man because of his grey hair, ratty cap and the holes in his clothes. The man turned out to work in creative development for Ralph Lauren , proving that you canâÄôt always judge a book by its cover (or its torn jeans). âÄúThe SartorialistâÄù is a fantastically laid-out book, each photo rendered in full, lush color on elegantly matte paper. The subjects of the photos are vivid, as though they could step off the page âÄî and they can, if you take cues from your favorites and include them in your own personal wardrobe. ItâÄôs not a how-to book, but it can be used that way.