Two candidates now running for UMN Professional Student Government President

After ACEC granted an extension for the filing deadline, two candidates are running for PSG president.

Left to right, Michael Blomquist, Sumee Lee, Max Hall and Dane Thompson gather onstage for the Professional Student Government presidential and vice presidential candidate debate on Wednesday in the Coffman Union Theater.

Daily File Photo

Left to right, Michael Blomquist, Sumee Lee, Max Hall and Dane Thompson gather onstage for the Professional Student Government presidential and vice presidential candidate debate on Wednesday in the Coffman Union Theater.

David Clarey

After a rocky start, the University of Minnesota’s professional student government now has two presidential candidates.

PSG lacked a presidential candidate after the original filing deadline, but the All Campus Election Committee granted an extension last week. Now, second-year law student Rachel Cardwell and first-year public affairs student Matt Berg are both running for president.

“My ability to help other people advocate and create a team … is something I deeply care about,” Berg said. “This is a role that, I hope, if I win … will be a catapult toward something better.”

Berg, who is the incoming vice president of the Public Affairs Student Association, said he was unaware of the original deadline, but was quick to file after he received an email notifying him of the extension.

He said his background in community organizing makes him qualified for the position, and that he will prioritize improving graduation and admission rates for minority students.

Cardwell, president of the University’s Federal Bar Association, said her experience in law and knack for collaboration would help her excel in her role as PSG president.

PSG amended the voting process this year, allowing president and vice president to run separately and not on the same ticket. Keerthanaa Jeeva is the sole vice presidential candidate.

Originally, another Humphrey student, Nicholas Rea, also filed, but after discussion with Berg, the decision was made to let Berg run alone.

Rea said they didn’t want to split the vote among the public affairs student population.