SSFC releases final fees funding levels for student groups

Several groups were awarded more funding than initially recommended.

Cali Owings

 

The Student Services Fees Committee released its final recommendations for student–group funding Wednesday.

Altogether the committee recommended $2,282,192 in student fees money for student groups — about $100,000 more than their initial recommendations.

Several groups that initially had their funding cut saw partial increases, including the Black Student Union, La Raza Student Cultural Center, MinnesoTap and the Ayn Rand Study Group.

For many groups, like the pre-medecine chapter of the American Medical Student Association, the upgrade is good news.

Pre-Med AMSA was only initially recommended $20,000 of their $75,075 request. After the committee reconsidered, the group was allocated about $14,000 more.

“With the upgrade we can definitely do a lot more with our programming here on campus,” said Holly Bui, the organization’s president.

Since it was only the group’s second year applying for fees, Bui said any additional funding was “a big number” for the group.

Kyle Kroll, the chairman of the student groups committee, said the committee paid close attention to carryover when deciding final recommendations. Many of the groups that had initially received full funding had their request reduced by their carryover amount. Since groups are supposed to be nonprofits, it’s against the rules for them to have fees money carryover from year to year.

Many groups that initially had food and travel expenses cut from their request had that money reinstated, Kroll said, if they were able to show the committee that those expenses were integral to the group like having traditional food at events for a cultural group.

“The committee wants to help groups but at the same time has a duty to follow those guidelines that have been set in place,” he said.

Recommendations decreased for both student government organizations — the Minnesota Student Association and the Graduate and Professional Student Assembly — by about $12,000 each.

Collegians for a Constructive Tomorrow’s request took a $109,000 hit when the committee released its initial recommendations. The group’s funding was further reduced to about $85,000 in the final recommendations.

Nick Amell, an officer with CFACT, said he was “pretty disappointed” with the committee’s recommendations and that the group has planned on appealing the decision.

Three groups that were initially going to receive zero funding were also reconsidered.

The SSFC recommended the Fraternity Purchasing Association receive $11,367 in student fees money as well as $6,310 for the Interfraternity Council and $2,656 for the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

Only two groups were denied funding — Men’s Club Basketball and STAND: A Student Anti-Genocide Coalition. According to the committee’s report, STAND failed to show up for its presentation.

Now that the final recommendations have been released, student groups have the opportunity to appeal the decision for any number of reasons, including misconduct of the committee, misapplication of one of the fees committee rules and misinterpretation of the group’s request by the committee.

Appeals must be submitted via email to the fees adviser and the chairperson of the Appeals Committee by 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 28.