U student’s brew on tap at local bars

Fulton Beer’s local affiliation has made it a popular offering at Twin Cities pubs.

Ryan Petz, a graduate student at the Carlson School of Management, explains the brewing process Monday in his co-worker’s garage in Minneapolis. Petz is the co-founder of Fulton Beer and has brews on tap at numerous area bar and restaurants.

Chelsey Rosetter

Ryan Petz, a graduate student at the Carlson School of Management, explains the brewing process Monday in his co-worker’s garage in Minneapolis. Petz is the co-founder of Fulton Beer and has brews on tap at numerous area bar and restaurants.

Luke Feuerherm

A meager Mr. Beer Kit has sparked a passion that has made four local brewers the toast of Twin City microbrews. The burgeoning beer company expanded their operation from closets and garages when it launched commercially in late October. Fulton BeerâÄôs original offering, Sweet Child of Vine, is now available in 10 bars and restaurants, including two taps on campus: Stub & Herbs and Acadia Cafe. âÄúEverybody loves the garage roots,âÄù said University of Minnesota graduate student Ryan Petz, co-founder of Fulton Beer. The companyâÄôs name even pays homage to those roots, named after the Fulton neighborhood in which the entrepreneurial venture began. After receiving the beer kit as a present from his girlfriend, Jim Diley acquired a passion for brewing beer from the comfort of home. Brian Hoffman and Petz adopted their friendâÄôs passion and cofounded Fulton Beer. Operations have since expanded and now include bi-monthly trips to a Wisconsin brewery, which allows Fulton Beer to produce enough brew to keep local establishments stocked. âÄúFulton [Beer] sold really well,âÄù said Josh Zavadil, owner of Stub & Herbs. âÄúIt was our beer of the month … and we sold through it.âÄù The businessâÄô current focus is generating recognition and demand, Petz said. Plans for the future include the addition of bottles to the companyâÄôs repertoire, four new recipes in the coming year and the expansion of bars with Fulton Beer on tap from 10 to 14. With these plans in place, the company continues to work out of a garage in the Fulton neighborhood, which functions primarily as the companyâÄôs laboratory for developing and fine-tuning new varieties of beer. University student and Acadia Cafe employee Alleen Brown described the beer as very drinkable and really good. âÄúI think everybody likes something local and something new. This is both of those things, so it has had a really good reception so far,âÄù Brown said. It is this local affiliation and the beerâÄôs flavor profile that have led to its warm welcome in the Twin Cities. âÄúThe first comments on our Web site regarding Fulton garnered about 70 comments on the first posting, and for us thatâÄôs a pretty big thing. We usually garner around five,âÄù said Ryan Anderson, founder and editor of mnbeer.com. The hype surrounding the beer has been matched by recent success. This success has resulted in national media attention and a stream of earnings, which allowed Fulton to become a self-sustaining operation, according to Petz. Petz accredits a portion of FultonâÄôs success to lessons learned in entrepreneurial classes at the Carlson School of Management. âÄúI did a lot of academic work that translated directly to the business,âÄù Petz said. The Fulton team anticipates their work will continue to reward, with hopes that one day a Fulton brewery in Minneapolis will come to fruition. Until then, Fulton beer will continue its effort to increase its presence on campus taps and throughout the Twin Cities.