IT students show their spirit this week

Todd Milbourn

After a semester-and-a-half of burrowing into the pages of technology textbooks and meticulously documenting experiments, the opening ceremony of IT Week on Monday marked the beginning of five days of relaxation and fun for technology students.
Students kicked off the week-long celebration — nicknamed “IT’s a Sign of the Times” — with a rock climb, a money grab and a barbecue in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science building courtyard.
“The week really brings out the spirit in IT,” said Shital Sheth, outgoing president of the Institute of Technology Student Board. “We’re so into studying, this really brings us together to interact.”
“This week shows we’re not all work and no play,” said Peter Hudleston, IT associate dean, in an opening ceremony address. “It mixes fun things with practical things.”
Amusement activities scheduled for IT Week include a concrete cylinder toss, a volleyball tournament and a night out at Sgt. Preston’s Bar and Grill.
The week’s practical highlight will come on Wednesday and Thursday with the technology fair.
At the fair, companies from throughout the country will set up information and job booths along Northrop Mall in an effort to link University technology students with prominent businesses.
Representatives from 3M Corp., IBM, General Motors Corp. and Lockheed Martin, among others, are expected to be in attendance.
The week’s happenings were scheduled and coordinated by the student-run, 12-member Plumb Bob Honorary Leadership Society.
“The goal is to get students in IT involved, see what’s going on and have fun,” said Katie Ohotto, president of Plumb Bob.
Following the opening ceremony, adventurous students had the chance to climb a 25-foot portable rock tower near the main entrance of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science building.
“This is way cooler than other walls I’ve climbed,” said Joe Young, a freshman chemistry student after scaling the wall. “IT is really cool for doing this.”
In a similar form, IT Week has been in existence since the early 1900s when the celebration was known as E-Day (Engineering Day).

Todd Milbourn covers science and technology. He welcomes comments at [email protected] He can also be reached at (612) 627-4070 x3231.