Birthday Suits streak to The Triple Rock

Local punk rockers return after a long and winding tour.

Birthday Suits streak to The Triple Rock

Tony Libera

Birthday Suits WHEN: June 19, 9 pm WHERE: The Triple Rock Social Club TICKETS: $7 Minneapolis is home to its fair share of face-melting acts, but few among them can match the raw, Ark of the Covenant-like power of punk rock duo Birthday Suits. In their five years as a band, the pair has released just two albums (coming in at a grand total of 37 minutes), yet theyâÄôve managed to stay at the forefront of the punk rock radar âÄî a testament to the quality of their tunes, the insanity of their live shows and their commitment to constant touring. With so little recorded music out on the market, one has to wonder if Birthday Suits have something against being in the studio. Guitarist and co-vocalist Hideo Takahashi says otherwise, attributing the lack of LPs to the amount of time spent on the road. âÄúWe like touring, and we do so much of it that we donâÄôt have time to be home and write new songs,âÄù Takahashi said. âÄúSo, itâÄôs like, we go tour, come home, then maybe write one or two songs and then go tour again. But itâÄôs nothing intentional âÄî we just donâÄôt have time.âÄù It took Birthday Suits half a decade to release their 2010 sophomore album, âÄúThe Minnesota – Mouth to Mouth,âÄù but it was worth the wait. The album paraded the bandâÄôs impeccable punk sensibilities but also showed the band moving in new directions and trying their hands at different genres. âÄúI used to listen to more punk and garage stuff, but the older I get, I feel I have a more open mind,âÄù Takahashi said, detailing the influences on the last album, which he attributes partly to drummer Matthew KazamaâÄôs broad tastes and partly to the experience of touring with so many different bands. Despite their changing style, Takahashi sees no need to rush out and record new albums, criticizing some for putting out too much material. âÄúI donâÄôt like that so many young bands make a CD, and they donâÄôt sell, but they still make new ones. ItâÄôs like, whatâÄôs the point unless people hear your music?âÄù Takahashi is definitely one of those guys who plays for his fans, as his wild stage antics and 110 percent attitude appear at every single show. Onstage, he flails about and stabs at his guitar, brimming with a potency that calls back to Iggy Pop and his proto-punk contemporaries. And somehow, against all odds, he continues to survive, despite the grueling touring schedule. âÄúYou know, IâÄôm a music fan and I donâÄôt like going to see bands that donâÄôt do anything. So many young guys just stand and play music. If youâÄôre not excited about your music, itâÄôs hard to get other people excited,âÄù Takahashi said. âÄúFor us, people pay to get in, and we just want it to be worth it.âÄù Birthday Suits come home June 19 for what is sure to be a perfectly frantic show at the Triple Rock Social Club . Those with sensitive ears might want to skip town âÄî Minneapolis is going to get loud.