Pride Week cinema

The Walker Art Center hosts the fourth series of “Queer Takes” this week

An image from “Fig Trees,” directed by John Greyson. PHOTO COURTESY WALKER ART CENTER

Ashley Goetz

An image from “Fig Trees,” directed by John Greyson. PHOTO COURTESY WALKER ART CENTER

Just in time for Pride Week, the fine folks at the Walker Art Center have taken it upon themselves to celebrate and examine GLBT culture. âÄúQueer Takes: Standing OutâÄù is a two-day film retrospective focusing on a variety of issues faced by the gay community. Now in its fourth edition, the topics of this yearâÄôs four-film installment of âÄúQueer TakesâÄù range from AIDS activism to homophobia in womenâÄôs basketball to lighthearted comedy. HereâÄôs a brief sampling of the WalkerâÄôs cinematographic offerings to add to your Pride Week schedule. Wednesday, June 24 âÄúTraining RulesâÄù DIRECTED BY: Dee Mosbacher, Fawn Yacker TIME: 7 p.m. TICKETS: $8 During her years at the helm of Penn StateâÄôs womenâÄôs basketball team, Rene Portland established some appallingly stringent guidelines for her players to follow: no drinking or drugs, and no lesbians. One player, Jen Harris, filed suit, and Portland ultimately resigned. The hour-long documentary âÄúTraining Rules,âÄù with a discussion to follow, contemplates the promising careers stalled by PortlandâÄôs homophobia and the anti-gay sentiments harbored by the sports world. âÄúFootball Under CoverâÄù DIRECTED BY: Ayat Najafi, David Assmann TIME: 8:45 p.m. TICKETS: $8 âÄúFootball Under CoverâÄù is another sports-centric film, but instead of American basketball, it focuses on a soccer match between Berlin and Iran. In order to play against Iran, the Berlin women must practice under Iranian codes of conduct while wearing traditional headscarves. Since the German team is made up of a good number of lesbian players, they are also required to hide their sexuality. âÄúFootball Under CoverâÄù is an examination of gender roles and prejudice. âÄúOur main goal âĦ was to convey an image of Iran that goes beyond the usual clichés and stereotypes,âÄù said the directors in a press release. âÄúWe want to show another side to the country, a different oneâĦ By creating a cultural dialogue via football, we are trying to put across a more realistic image, one that is not ideologically warped from the outset.âÄù Thursday, June 25 âÄúFig TreesâÄù DIRECTOR: John Greyson TIME: 7:30 p.m. TICKETS: free âÄúFig TreesâÄù is the story of AIDS activists Tim McCaskell and Zackie Achmat , whose champion cause is accessibility of disease-fighting drugs for all infected South Africans. Ten years ago, Achmat refused to treat himself until all South Africans could be treated equally. Achmat founded the Treatment Action Campaign , and his strike raised the awareness of Nelson Mandela, who pleaded with Achmat to begin treatment; however, he still refused to take medication until 2003. The thought-provoking and oft-entertaining âÄúFig TreesâÄù won the Teddy Award at the Berlin Film Festival and is set to lush musical scoring. ItâÄôs âÄúa documentary opera about pills, Gertrude Stein and AIDS activism,âÄù according to the filmâÄôs tagline. Though its subject matter is serious and dark, âÄúFig TreesâÄù is kooky and avant-garde too, jumping about stylistically and starring not only Canadian McCaskell and the South African Achmat, but a singing squirrel as well. âÄúFig TreesâÄù speaks of the ethics of modern medicine and the AIDS epidemic, how the government and pharmaceutical companies choose to handle the disease, the ethical practices of medicine and how those infected celebrate life and hope for the future. âÄú575 Castro Street,âÄù precedes âÄúFig TreesâÄù DIRECTED BY: Jenni Olson âÄúMilk,âÄù the movie bio of slain activist Harvey Milk , won national critical acclaim last year for its portrayal of a revolution, and during the filming Jenni Olson shot photos she then set to an edited 13-minute audio recording taped by Milk in the event of his assassination.