Incredifunny

The Lonely Island comedy troupe of “SNL’s” famed digital shorts brings more tunes.

PHOTO COURTESY REPUBLIC RECORDS

Ashley Goetz

PHOTO COURTESY REPUBLIC RECORDS

The Lonely Island ALBUM: âÄúIncredibadâÄù LABEL: Republic Records TheyâÄôve jizzed in their pants, put dicks in boxes, enjoyed lazy Sundays and âÄî in turn âÄî won over legions of fans largely via their âÄúSNL Digital ShortâÄù viral videos. Formed in 2001 by friends Akiva Shaffer, Jorma Taccone and Andy Samberg, The Lonely Island comedy troupe has enjoyed a massive surge in popularity over the past couple years and are poised to capitalize on it with their debut record âÄúIncredibad.âÄù With Tenacious D dominating the rock-centric comedy market and Flight of the Conchords gripping the folksy sect, The Lonely Island operate out of the next logical farce genre âÄî hip-hop. With neither Tenacious DâÄôs star power (Jack BlackâÄôs fame) or Flight of the ConcordsâÄô regular visual element (their HBO show), âÄúIncredibadâÄù takes a smart approach by relying heavily on cameos (T-Pain, Nora Jones, E-40, Justin Timberlake, Natalie Portman âÄî even Jack Black himself ) rather than hedging its bet on the draw of minor celeb Samberg and his relatively unknown bandmates/friends. âÄúIncredibadâÄùâÄôs opening track âÄúWho Said WeâÄôre Wack?âÄù puts forth Loney IslandâÄôs basic formula: taking the dumbest stereotypes of mainstream rap, applying even dumber ideas to those stereotypes (jizz, Chronicles of Narnia, boats) and demonstrating the absurdities of both in doing so. âÄúWho Said WeâÄôre WackâÄù centers on The Lonely Island members expounding on how âÄúwackâÄù they find it that someone calls them âÄúwackâÄù while never revealing any tangible aspects of the argument other than the universal wackness. ItâÄôs that dismantling of hip-hop idiocies (in this case, warrantless chest-pounding) that The Lonely Island excels in. âÄúIncredibadâÄù is weighted heavily on the already famous âÄúSNL Digital ShortsâÄù, which even sans visuals remain hilarious. While the famous songs tend to be superior, some of the album tracks are dually hilarious. âÄúSantana DVX (feat. E-40)âÄù is a rap about a hypothetical champagne created by âÄô70s rocker Carlos Santana and dubbed âÄúSantana DVX.âÄù Hinging on the general absurdity of a goofy looking 61-year-old classic rocker becoming a rap scene staple with his drink, lines such as âÄúWhatâÄôs the first name in Champ?/ItâÄôs Carlos!/And to that man I propose a toast/In the âÄò60s he had lotsa freebie sex/but now heâÄôs gettinâÄô down with the DVX,âÄù give the track some memorable/laughable moments. The middle track âÄúLike a BossâÄù features an interviewer asking Samberg if heâÄôs âÄúin charge around hereâÄù to which he replies âÄúthatâÄôs right, IâÄôm the bossâÄù in a fake ghetto-tough accent. ItâÄôs there the beat kicks in and Samberg details his average day with lines like, âÄúCall a sex line!/Cry deeply!/Eat a bagel!âÄù with a looped sample of a burly man shouting âÄúlike a boss!âÄù after break. The title-track finale takes the album out on a high note as it details the groupâÄôs formation as 13-year-olds who encounter, have sex with and are granted rapping powers by a provocative alien. The three members of The Lonely Island are indisputably funny dudes. Their humor, though, is suited best in the one-track-at-a-time format that introduced the world to them via their internet smash videos. âÄúIncredibadâÄù is a solid album, but whereas Tenacious D and Flight of the Concords have original and interesting musicianship to lift their sometimes iffy subject matter up, The Lonely IslandâÄôs recycled rap beats afford them no such luxuries. Perfect for extremely devoted fans of the groupâÄôs juvenile but uproarious sense of humor, âÄúIncredibadâÄôsâÄù best tracks are already available online for the rest of us.