Punishing speech in workplace is itself punishable

It was with great dismay that I and likely most other members of the University community learned about the extraordinarily poor judgment on the part of the Office of the Publisher at The Minnesota Daily in suspending an employee without pay for exercising free speech rights. This draconian measure gives every appearance of attempting to squash dissent and dialogue among the staff at the paper in light of the very questionable judgment to award bonuses to members of the Office of the Publisher in light of drastic cutbacks throughout the rest of the paper. I call on all members of the University community to support the immediate termination from employment of the members of the Office of the Publisher who instigated this unethical act âÄî at the very least, suspension without pay. If such an action is not taken we perpetuate the all-too-common assumption that employees everywhere must give up their free speech rights when they open the office door, that dissent is punishable by denial of the right to work and that personal slight can form the hidden rationale for the decision to mistreat employees. Eric Snyder University student