Charges filed in prosthetics case

A former University employee is charged with selling stolen prosthetics on eBay.

Alma Pronove

A Coon Rapids, Minn., man was charged Friday for allegedly stealing and selling prosthetics from the University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview in 2011.

Federal prosecutors charged 52-year-old Peter Stasica with wire fraud after he allegedly sold prosthetics while serving as the manager of the Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics at the center.

According to the charges, the FBI found Stasica was taking prosthetics without authorization from February 2011 to August 2011. He then sold those supplies on eBay to customers in Minnesota and North Dakota.

In addition to stealing prosthetics and prosthetic-related supplies like liners and socks, Stasica was also allegedly soliciting patients for the prosthetics they weren’t using without telling them he planned to sell them online.

Stasica hasn’t worked at Fairview since August 2011, according to spokesman Ryan Davenport.

The Fairview Medical Center conducted an internal investigation in response to the allegations and has worked with federal investigators.

“We’re committed to the highest ethical standards in all of our operations and business practices,” Davenport said.

Stasica faces up to 20 years in prison and will appear in federal court April 11.

Man charged with videotaping minors at Mariucci

A Coon Rapids, Minn., man is facing up to two years in prison for allegedly videotaping a young boy at Mariucci Arena.

Robert Minor, 53, appeared in court Monday morning after he was charged last week with privacy interference. Investigators found a wristwatch camera with video footage of several young boys in his home.

According to the criminal complaint, the defendant made two video recordings, one of several boys watching the hockey game and another of a boy using the restroom.

The video shows an 8- to 12-year-old boy urinating into a urinal trough, according to the complaint.

University police officer Jason Tossey, who investigated the videos, said the boy appeared uncomfortable in the 47-second recording, according to the complaint. At the end of the recording, the defendant looked into the camera, Tossey said, and his face could be seen.

The videos were taken on Dec. 31, 2011, during the men’s hockey Mariucci Classic Tournament.

In the complaint, Tossey said he was able to identify the location as Mariucci Arena because he has worked at the hockey games for 13 years.

Minor faces up to two years in prison with a $5,000 fine.