You may say that I’m a dreamer …

In response to Ross AndersonâÄôs question at the end of his latest column, asking if tolerance is a more a learned characteristic and racism more natural, I would agree in this sentiment, but add that even prior to the ability of humans to be racist or âÄútolerant,âÄù the very core of humanity is love. For example, if a young child has all their basic needs met âÄîfood, water, shelter and love âÄî then the most natural thing for them to exude is love, love and only love. At this stage in human development, a child cannot make any distinction between oneself and âÄúthe outside world,âÄù being wholly inclusive and viewing everything as intricately connected. And this is the place that we must get back to during our lives to overcome the pain of racism and even to overcome the half-hearted sense of âÄútolerance.âÄù Full-hearted disconnections (i.e. racism or hatred) and half-hearted disconnections (i.e. mere tolerance) from other people and other living creatures is what has caused all that currently plagues our world: a fallen economy, global warming, the inherently racist societal structures of America, etc. Moving from hate to like to love is no easy task and not for the faint of heart, but it is what is necessary for us to regain the full humanity of our lives. As John Lennon so aptly put, âÄúIf everyone demanded peace instead of another television set, then thereâÄôd be peaceâÄù. Fundamentally, I interpret this statement as âÄúIf everyone demanded what they truly want (i.e. love) instead of what theyâÄôre told they want (i.e. another TV), then thereâÄôd be not only peace, but a world without racism and a world without the need for a half-hearted word like âÄútoleranceâÄù, but a world filled only with love.âÄù That, my friends, is a world worth fighting for. Jon Delperdang, University student