College Kitchen: Popsicles

An assortment of frozen, refreshing popsicles.

Liam James Doyle

An assortment of frozen, refreshing popsicles.

Yena Lee

Popsicles are a treat with many talents. They can relieve sore throats when you’re battling a cold while still cooling you off during the hot summer months. 
 
Although fruit popsicles are the frozen norm, other variations — such as chia pudding pops — pack a lot of nutrition into the tasty treat.
 
Chia seeds contain a lot of protein for few calories. Their ability to curb hunger makes them perfect for breakfast. Ditch your cereal with milk, and spice up your life with a chia pudding popsicle in the morning. 
 
And even though the weather outside is inconsistent, you can still celebrate the near-end of the semester with these cold, tasty treats.
 
Coconut chia pudding popsicles
With chia seeds in the mix, these are the perfect breakfast item on the go.
 
1 can coconut milk (well-shaken)
1/4 cup chia seeds
2 tablespoons sugar
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 cup fruit (frozen or fresh) (recommended: mango, pineapple, blueberries)
 
1. Shake the can of coconut milk vigorously until everything is homogenous. 
 
2. Pour the coconut milk into a medium-sized bowl, and add in chia seeds, sugar and vanilla extract.
 
3. Place the coconut-chia seed mixture in the fridge for 3-4 hours to allow the chia seeds to expand. (Chia seeds absorb up to nine times their original weight in
water.)
 
4. In a popsicle mold, add in a layer of the coconut-chia seed mixture and then a layer of fruit. Alternate layers until the mold is filled.
 
5. Insert popsicle sticks, and freeze overnight for the best results.
 
Tip: To release the popsicles out of their molds with ease, run the molds under hot water for a few seconds.
 
 
Watermelon and cucumber popsicles
The combination of the watermelon, cucumber and lime is sweet and refreshing, making these a perfect frozen treat.
 
1 cup watermelon
1/2 English cucumber (peeled)
1/4 cup simple syrup
juice of one lime
 
For the syrup:
 
To make a rich simple syrup, make sure the ratio of sugar to water is 2:1. 
 
1. Over low heat, dissolve sugar and water in a saucepan. (Make as much you want; the simple syrup has other uses, too, and is a great addition to iced drinks.)
 
2. Once all of the sugar melts, let the syrup cool for about 10-15 minutes to thicken before using.
 
For the popsicles:
 
1. Add all the ingredients into a blender or food processor. Blend well.
 
2. Run the mixture through a fine sieve.
 
3. Fill the popsicle molds and freeze for 45 minutes to an hour. Then, insert popsicle sticks.
 
4. Let the popsicles freeze overnight for best results.