Work-study blues

I am quite dismayed at the depth of last year’s budget cuts. I am currently a junior, and although I am qualified, I will be unable to receive work-study funds for the school year. Why?

Because the funds were distributed first to freshmen, and the University ran out of money before all students with financial need were given assistance. Without work-study, it is very difficult to find a job on campus.

I simply wanted to work in the library, but now I’m forced to look at off-campus employment – which is not convenient or desirable.

It seems that the bulk of scholarships go to incoming freshmen, and thus it becomes more difficult to receive financial aid (in forms other than loans) when a student reaches upper-class status. Therefore, these students are in greater need for tuition money – so why aren’t they awarded work-study first? In many cases, upper-classmen are more qualified for on-campus positions, but how are they able to give their skills to the University when work-study is required for employment?

Last year’s legislative budget cuts lie at the root of this problem, so we as students need to speak out. It is not fair that students eligible for aid are being passed over because there isn’t enough money to go around. Shouldn’t all of us as students have equal access to on-campus employment? While this problem is not likely to be repaired soon, the least we can do is get out and vote this fall. We need to let the state know how much these budget cuts take away from our experiences at the University.


Emily Forbes,
junior,
urban studies