Daily Digest: Secret Service scandal spreads, Obama’s possible CISPA veto, PBS shows see cuts

Jeff Hargarten

 

The budding U.S. Secret Service prostitution scandal has expanded to El Salvador, The Wall Street Journal reported.

Agents on detail in the country in 2011 allegedly visited strip clubs and paid for sex with prostitutes, which could challenge the idea that the recent revelations concerning similar activity in Columbia were not merely isolated incidents.

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The Obama administration has threatened to veto the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, which is heading for a Friday vote in the House of Representatives.

The controversial cyber-security bill has been criticized by Democrats and President Barack Obama for not doing enough to protect people’s online privacy in the government’s quest to coordinate with technology companies on defending against security threats.

But advocates and analysts worry Obama may not follow through on the veto, citing similar ovations from the administration regarding the National Defense Authorization Act bill, which the president signed on December 31, 2011.

Despite the promise of a veto, GOP lawmakers are pressing forward with the legislation.

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The National Endowment for the Arts made drastic cuts to PBS grant funding Wednesday, The New York Times reported.

Affected shows include “Live from Lincoln Center,” which was awarded nothing this year, “Great Performances for the Met,” which received $100,000 less, while “Great Performances” and “American Masters” received a mere fraction of what they received last year.

“The PBS NewsHour,” “POV,” and “Independent Lens” also had their grants cut.