Broman set to battle with hometown squad

Anders Broman is the all-time leading scorer in state basketball history.

Jace Frederick

Anders Broman scored more points than any high school basketball player in Minnesota state history, but it wasn’t enough to attract his home-state school.

Now Broman, a freshman guard for South Dakota State, will face the Gophers on their home court Tuesday.

He said he understood why he didn’t get attention from any Big Ten programs.

“I’m kind of undersized,” he said. “I’m not super athletic, so I don’t have those types of things going for me.”

He might lack the flash and sparkle that major colleges covet from their prized recruits, but he can do one thing better than most: score.

Broman filled it up in high school like the state of Minnesota had never seen.

The previous Minnesota state record for points scored in a high school career was 4,086. Broman finished with 5,119 during his six years playing for Lakeview Christian Academy in Duluth, Minn. Twice he scored at least 70 points in a game.

But he didn’t receive any scholarship offers until he played AAU ball the summer after his junior year. He joined Howard Pulley and played in the same backcourt as Apple Valley point guard and Duke commit Tyus Jones.

Howard Pulley head coach Antwan Harris said Broman struggled when he first joined the Panthers because he had to deal with bigger, faster and stronger defenders.

“The first couple of games, he was having trouble getting his shot off,” Harris said.

But he said Broman was able to adjust to the quicker pace after his first tournament with Howard Pulley.

“It was more of him speeding his game up a little bit,” Harris said.

South Dakota State head coach Scott Nagy said he saw Broman play in the Class A state tournament at the end of his junior campaign, and he didn’t play well.

But Nagy and his staff continued to recruit Broman. When Nagy watched him play for Howard Pulley at the Peach Jam — one of the AAU’s top summer tournaments — Broman’s improvement showed.

“Anders played really well down there,” Nagy said. “He proved that he was capable of playing with anybody. That’s where we really, really got interested in him.”

Nagy said he saw a tough kid who was more than just a scorer.

“He just does whatever is needed of him,” he said. “He’s a very unselfish guy.”

As soon as Broman committed to SDSU, he was compared to former All-America guard and St. Cloud, Minn., native Nate Wolters — currently a rookie with the Milwaukee Bucks.

Broman said the success Wolters had at SDSU played a large role in his decision to play for the Jackrabbits, but he doesn’t agree with the comparison.

“Nate’s the best player to ever have played here at SDSU,” Broman said. “I’m not trying to be the next Nate Wolters. There never will be another Nate Wolters.”