Review: Sisterworld

The newest from LA’s ever-evolving three-piece might be their most creative yet.

PHOTO COURTESY MUTE RECORDS

PHOTO COURTESY MUTE RECORDS

Mark Brenden

Liars Album: “Sisterworld” Label: Mute Records The several reinventions of Liars have placed them in many boxes. The ten-year-old Los Angeles indie band have been tacked as dance-punk, post-punk revival, noise rock, art punk and experimental rock. Perhaps the band themselves put it best on their MySpace, where in each of the three genres they can fill out they put “Other/Other/Other.” I guess MySpace doesn’t offer “Salem Witch Trial / Seizure Rock / Creative as hell” as options. Their fifth transmutation, “Sisterworld,” finds the Thom Yorke-endorsed three-piece predictable in at least two senses: they’re impressive and they’re creepy. If the three weird sisters from “Macbeth” collaborated on an album, they probably would have come to a similar conclusion. Almost every song has some sort of sinister chanting, some sort of spazmatic shift and a lot of heavy drum and guitar work. It’s like if Radiohead’s “Kid A” was recorded with a satanic cult and a rowdy soccer crowd. The opening track “Scissor” weaves in and out of soulful gospel and seizure-inducing pandemonium. “No Barrier Fun” has a TV on the Radio vibe on top of the witchy gloom. The eerie violin and ghostly intoning of “counting victims one by one” on “Here Comes All the People” make the track sound like a medieval torture scene. “Scarecrow on a Killer Slant” is a train wreck of loudly descending guitar riffs, tornado drums and larynx-slashing wails. If you are looking for a jovial sunshine record with which to usher in springtime, look elsewhere (Chamillionaire and Ludacris have new ones on the way). But if a well-crafted, inventive piece of introspective art is more your cup o’ tea, then Sisterworld is where you want to be. 4/5 stars