Two U students pump up the jam with DJ businesses

Both Lynch’s and Huynh’s interest in DJing was sparked by their love for music.

Angela Gray

Investing in fraternity parties and bat mitzvahs by launching a disc jockey business cashes in for some young entrepreneurs.

Two University students are taking business into their own hands and have entered the world of DJing.

University economics junior Ryan Lynch is going into his second year co-owning and operating a DJ business called Profound Sound Deejays.

But he says his business goes back much further than that.

“As soon as I got my driver’s license, I started DJing parties using a small PA system, two five-disc CD players and Christmas lights that would flash to the beats of the music,” he said.

After several weddings, school dances and parties, Lynch decided he wanted to “see where things could go and what things could happen.”

“A private investor had faith in my business partner and me and gave us a loan to buy new equipment and really get the ball rolling,” he said.

Lynch said he does all the business accounting and finances.

“It’s a small company, so it’s simple to organize and good practice,” he said.

His education has carried over to his business and he has learned from his mistakes and accomplishments, Lynch said.

“I’m a bit of a perfectionist when it comes to the business operations, details are very important,” he said.

Gavin Grivma, a Residence Hall Association executive board member at St. Thomas University, hired Lynch to DJ a Halloween dance in October.

“Lynch was recommended to me by a friend and the kid seemed really interested and well put together,” Grivma said.

Grivma said that during the dance, Lynch played different songs for different moods and put a lot of thought into the process.

“The crowd really took to him and I was very pleased,” he said.

For fellow DJ Dan Huynh, a communications junior, it all started with a saxophone and some advice from a high school business teacher.

Huynh said forming his own DJ business stemmed from his extensive background in music. He has played the saxophone since fourth grade.

“I always loved music and in high school, when I would go to school dances, I realized the DJs running the dances weren’t hip,” he said.

Huynh said, “They were old guys that weren’t in tune with what’s hot and had no crowd interaction.”

After a business teacher propelled the idea of starting his own DJ business, Huynh said he was convinced.

He sat down, wrote a business plan and set up a four-person management team.

Four years later, Huynh’s NRG-X entertainment DJ business’ core service and primary focus is the high school crowd.

“We specialize, unlike other DJs that just want the big bucks doing corporate and high-profile events.”

Huynh said his business tries to reach out to student councils and activities coordinators through cold calling, mailing and Web site advertising.

Huynh said that as a business owner, he extracts skills from the education side.

“You are able to understand what’s going on in your classes and are able to ask a lot more questions,” Huyhn said.

“Everything I have, I got from school,” he said.

Lynch and Huynh expressed similar goals of becoming a multi-system DJ service and franchising.

Lynch said, “At some point in life, I’m sure I’ll be stuck in the corporate rat race, but I’d like to reach a point where I can start doing business and investment in areas of entertainment, clubs and bars.”

Lynch and Huynh said their passion for music, dance and entertainment keeps them motivated.

“I have so much fun DJing,” Huynh said. “I still get butterflies before a packed 400-person event.”

Lynch said having his own business means “more money, more control and just plain more fun.”

“I schedule when I work and who I work for,” he said. “And I enjoy every minute and cent of it.”