We need to let recent issues go for the greater good of campus

Ever since I read the Minnesota Daily’s article regarding Brother Jed’s visit to campus and how Chick-fil-A has been affecting the university atmosphere, I have hoped that students and faculty see a pattern here on how we as a student body and community should react to these acts and events on campus.

Whenever people come to campus and try to make a statement about a certain opinion or belief systems, many within the student body challenge them and their ideas. This is not to attack them, rather it’s because they are respectful toward everyone on campus and their ideas — an open and honest discussion, rather than outright disagreement or attack, are true signs of a good intellectual community.

We should be proud that many of our minority student groups and groups that adhere to unique ideas on campus find inclusivity and are welcomed in their respective spaces.

I came out religiously a few years ago as an atheist, but I am still friends with many religious people on campus. Even though I have not practiced religion in over five years, I am still respectful toward religious people and their beliefs. I have noticed that more and more students are confused about their religious beliefs, yet spirituality is rarely treated as an open issue.

To get my point across, companies like Chick-fil-A have had their political views suddenly subjected to consumers. Though they have seen their share of scandal nationally, it would be of the University’s and the students’ best interest to try to be as inclusive as possible, without hate toward any one person or group — or in this case, a business. As a community, much of our actions are seen as shared or communal, especially when we exist as one large, connected university community. Of course there are the conservative and the liberals who wear the “Vote Yes” or “Vote No” T-shirts; they do not cause riots or protests in the middle of Northrop Mall or make headlines in the Daily or Fox News. They do not disrespectfully attack each other or deteriorate the legitimacy of the community.

As part of the University of Minnesota, we should be proud. We have a very respectful campus atmosphere, and we need to let the drama go and finally realize everyone’s place in the university community.