Two car accidents occur near U campuses, unknown thieves steal from the Daily

Koran Addo

Two serious car accidents had University police and Hennepin County rescue workers working into the early morning Wednesday.

In the first incident, 24-year-old Minneapolis resident Nicholas Osberg was speeding eastbound on University Avenue Southeast, according to police reports.

When he accelerated to run a red light at the corner of University and 17th avenues southeast, he struck another car.

Minneapolis police officer Ron Reier said Osberg’s car struck the driver’s side of motorist Hyun Kim’s car before hitting pedestrian Vaughn Kelly, who was walking in the crosswalk.

Witnesses said Osberg stumbled out of his car and curled up into the fetal position on the lawn of a nearby building for a few seconds before getting up and sprinting eastbound on University Avenue Southeast.

University police later apprehended and arrested Osberg, and charged him with DWI.

Paramedics extracted Kim from the car before taking him and Vaughn to the hospital.

In the second incident, Lauderdale, Minn., resident Robert Farnsworth was speeding down Cleveland Avenue on the St. Paul campus when his car struck a parked car. Farnsworth’s car then began to overturn, hitting three other cars parked on the street and landing on its roof approximately 30 feet away, according to police reports.

University Deputy Police Chief Steve Johnson said witnesses used a fire extinguisher to douse the car, which caught fire while Farnsworth was still in it.

Farnsworth was transported to the hospital before officers arrested him and charged him with DWI, Johnson said.

Several thousand dollars of property was stolen from The Minnesota Daily’s building this week.

Tuesday morning several employees showed up for work and said their personal tape recorders had been stolen.

After further inventory, the Daily employees said they discovered that the unknown thief or thieves stole other items, including clothing and camera equipment valued at several thousand dollars.

At first, several Daily employees said they thought they had been victims of a prank.

Britt Johnsen, a Daily reporter, speaking on her own behalf, questioned why someone would steal tape recorders and leave other more valuable things. She said recorders do not have much value to anyone other than reporters.

Johnson said any time someone breaks into a building and steals property it has to be considered serious and more than a prank.

Johnson said thieves often steal property and leave other valuables behind because they search for items they want specifically or know they can sell easily.

The crime – which is not unique on campus – is not new to the Daily, either.

Shane Hoefer, Daily editor in chief, said several other items have been stolen from the Daily over the course of the semester.