Culture Compass: Os Mutantes, Liz, Dick

A&E plans your weekend. You’re welcome, stinkers.

Martina Marosi

Thursday

Who: Minnesota Artists Exhibition Program: Broc Blegen & Binod Shrestha

Where: Minneapolis Institute of Arts

2400 S. Third Ave., Minneapolis

When: 10 a.m.–9 p.m.

Price: Free

 

The Minnesota Artists Exhibition Program (MAEP) stakes out its corner at the MIA once again with this double-exhibition featuring Nepalese artist Binod Shrestha, with his political, “Remnants and Rumination,” in tandem with University of Minnesota graduate Broc Blegen and his show, “Coming Out Party,” a collection of Blegen’s facsimiles of famous works of art. Ruminations, robberies and a rousing good evening.

Friday

Who: Os Mutantes with Writer

Where: The Cedar Cultural Center

416 S. Cedar Ave., Minneapolis

 

When: 8 p.m.

Price: $20

Tropicalia legends Os Mutantes are sauntering into town as the rag-tag group that’s kept the good times rollin’ since the 1960s.  Respected and acclaimed by the likes of the Flaming Lips and David Byrne, the Brazilian psychedelic band should be considered a staple in the musical diets of international music connoisseurs looking to stay up to date on the oldies. Two parts sunshine, one part occult demonology and all parts delightful, Os Mutantes at the Cedar is unlikely to disappoint.

Saturday

Who: Labyrinth

Where: Uptown Theatre

2906 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis

When: Midnight

Price: $9

A distractingly well-endowed David Bowie tries to seduce a teenage Jennifer Connelly through the art of song while prancing about his M.C. Escher-like castle after kidnapping her baby brother in an attempt to win her affections. But that’s just the icing atop of a seven-layer-nostalgia cake fit for children and potheads alike. Jim Henson’s mad puppet creations give this cult classic bursts of warm, fuzzy feelings mixed among the chaos of the Goblin King’s endlessly complex labyrinth and the challenges Sarah (Connelly) faces within.

CULTURE TO CONSUME

Listen to this: “All Things Must Pass,” George Harrison

Mourn the good George on the 11th anniversary of his passing with a full-day listening of his debut solo work, “All Things Must Pass.” A triple-album classic and Harrison’s first since the breakup of the Beatles, “All Things” is jam-packed with tinkling gems like everybody’s favorite “My Sweet Lord” and the rainy-day “Let it Down.” It’s the perfect soundtrack for a day spent cozied up inside with a gallon of hot tea by your bedside and a stack of books to read.
 

Watch this: Lifetime Network’s Liz and Dick”

If you didn’t catch it when it premiered Sunday night, Lifetime’s biopic of the most hot, saucy and teeming romance to go down in history has since been received as warmly by critics as a dump on their doorstep. This time, the Lifetime camp-factory has really outdone itself. With the frustrated talents of the tragically plastic Lindsay Lohan in the form of the cinema Golden Age’s last star, they’ve taken the grand love story of Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor and turned it into a two-hour, over-acted train wreck that’s already immaculate late-night shoddy film fodder.

Read this: “Brave Thinkers” the Atlantic, November 2012

It’s almost the end of the semester. Like some cartoonish jumble of hapless factory workers, students are barely able to keep up with the conveyer belt of reading endlessly moving before them. This means that for a short, torturous time, leisure reading is all but out of the question. This week, treat yourself to a thumb-throughable list of the Atlantic’s “Brave Thinkers” that will inspire you just as much as it will inspire great feelings of inadequacy. Organized online in a user-friendly picto-grid, this year’s list is complemented by recipients of the bravery nod in decades past, alongside a bundle of write-ups on, among others, American nuns, Pussy Riot, teenage nuclear science prodigy Taylor Wilson and, unfortunately, Lena Dunham.