In stirring upset, Donald Trump defeats Hillary Clinton in bid for 45th presidency

By 2 a.m. Wednesday, Trump had locked up 276 of the needed 270 electoral votes, while Clinton had 218.

Preston Rodrigues celebrates as another state is called for Donald Trump on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016 at the Radisson Blue Mall of America in Bloomington.

Easton Green

Preston Rodrigues celebrates as another state is called for Donald Trump on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016 at the Radisson Blue Mall of America in Bloomington.

Minnesota Daily Staff

Businessman Donald Trump defeated Hillary Clinton to become the 45th President of the United States.

The results defied nearly every poll and prediction showing a Clinton victory, though her lead had shrunk in the days leading up to the election. Riding an anti-establishment wave, Trump made few political allies but tapped into the frustrations of many Americans who felt ignored by political elites.

As of 2 a.m. Wednesday morning, Trump had locked up 276 of the needed 270 electoral votes, while Clinton had 218. Minnesota had yet to be called.

The president elect was greeted by chants of “U.S.A.” before he began his triumphant speech.

“As ive said from the beginning, ours was not a campaign, but rather an incredible and great movement,” Trump said in his speech. “The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer.”

He said he will focus on fixing cities, the economy and taking care of veterans.

Wisconsin locked up Trump’s victory after early wins in North Carolina, Florida and Ohio paved the way earlier in the day.

Financial market futures tumbled, according to the Los Angeles Times, which reported that the Dow Jones industrial average dropped more than 700 points — about 4 percent.

The Associated Press reported that both houses in Congress are expected to remain in Republican control, meaning that Trump’s election could have far-reaching consequences on future Supreme Court justices.

In the House, Republicans had 235 seats to the Democrats’ 177, according to the Associated Press.

And in the Senate, Republicans took hold of 51 seats, compared to Democrats 47.

In Minnesota, GOP members spanning multiple ages gathered in a red-tinted room at the Radisson Blu at the Mall of America.

As the results for Georgia came across two large screens in the main lobby, supporters chanted “Lock her up,” referencing one of the many slogans adopted by Trump supporters.

Laura Dolezalek, 18, a student at the University of St. Thomas, said she voted for Trump because of her aversion toward Clinton, his stance on building a wall along the Mexican border, abortion and tax cuts for the middle class.

“You see a lot of nasty on both sides, but then you have to look for the good and it just seemed like there was a lot [better] with Trump, foreign policy-wise and economically,” said Sam Mustar, 19, a University of Minnesota Duluth student, at the event.

“What’s surprising is it might actually happen,” said Luis Melendez of a Trump victory. “What’s not surprising is that I believe in the American people … People are tired of the establishment.”

He said religious liberty, Supreme Court picks, abortion rights and gun rights were the biggest things that drew him to Trump’s camp.

At the Minnesota DFL Party gathering at the downtown Minneapolis Hilton, supporters were uneasy with Trump’s early lead.

“It kind of makes me sick. I’m worried about the future, but I guess America spoke. We’ll just have to see what happens,” said Katie Garraty, 32, of North Minneapolis.

North Minneapolis resident Nick Moss, 24, said he was “disgusted and terrified” for friends in the LGBTQ community. “It’s not about me, it’s about them.”

By 1 a.m., the crowd at the party began to thin, with about 250 people left.

Local fights for control of the Legislature had yet to be decided, according to the Star Tribune.