Clinton unveils terrorism plan

Speaking at the McNamara Alumni Center, the presidential candidate outlined a five-step plan to counter terrorism.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to a crowd at the McNamara Alumni Center on Tuesday where she outlined her intentions to combat terrorism on an international level as well as the home front.

Liam James Doyle

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to a crowd at the McNamara Alumni Center on Tuesday where she outlined her intentions to combat terrorism on an international level as well as the home front.

Hannah Schacherlerl

Calling for collaboration between government and citizens to fight terrorism, presidential candidate Hillary Clinton unveiled her plan to combat violent extremism in the United States Tuesday.
 
“We need to come together to celebrate diversity, not fear it,” Clinton said in her speech at the McNamara Alumni Center. “The community needs to come together to resist radicalization.”
 
Clinton’s speech follows the arrest of the 10th Somali-American in Minnesota charged with plans to fight in Syria. According to a report released in September by the U.S. House Committee on Homeland Security, 15 of 58 American ISIS recruits came from Minnesota. 
 
To dismantle ISIS, Clinton said, the U.S. needs to destroy its roots in the Middle East and cut off its global recruitment network. To diminish terrorism in the U.S., Clinton provided a five-point plan. 
 
The plan consists of halting online recruitment, preventing Americans from joining the fighting overseas and returning to the U.S., supporting law enforcement operations to disrupt terror plots, and empowering Muslim-American communities. 
 
She emphasized she would implement her plan all at once and would require that allies cooperate. Clinton said her plan is different from recent statements given by her
 
Republican counterparts and said that some of her opponents’ recent comments could push away potential allies. 
 
Tracking down recruitment efforts online, Clinton said, requires stronger relations between Washington and technology companies. She called upon social media companies
to be diligent in monitoring and removing such content from their sites and recommended that the country consider social media activity when approving visa applications. 
 
“We should be using all capabilities to deny jihadists’ virtual territory, just like we would for actual territory,” she said.
 
Clinton decried anti-Islam sentiments, saying, “We cannot lend credence to the phrase, ‘War on Islam.’”
 
Clinton called for greater inclusion of Muslim-American communities and praise for their accomplishments.
 
“These Americans may be our first, last and best defense against homegrown radicalization and terrorism,” she said.
 
Clinton cited Minneapolis’ pilot program to counter violent extremism, Building Community Resilience, as an example of the right way to open communication. 
 
The program involves collaboration among parents, youth groups, Muslim leaders, law enforcement, business leaders and schools. 
 
“Here in the Twin Cities, you have an innovative partnership that brings together parents, teachers, imams and others in the Somali-American community with law enforcement, nonprofits, local businesses, mental health professionals and others to intervene with young people who are at risk. It deserves increased support,” Clinton 
said. 
 
Clinton’s call for greater recognition prompted a standing ovation from audience members, as did her stance on gun control.
 
Increased gun control in the U.S. would function as a key part of fighting terrorism, Clinton said.
 
“If you’re too dangerous to fly, you’re too dangerous to buy a gun,” Clinton said. 
 
Citizens need to hold onto their American values, Clinton said, with courage and clarity.
 
“We cannot let terrorists make us abandon our humanitarian side,” Clinton said. “We have to turn fear into resolve.”