Initial recommendations fund most administrative units

Two organizations were given only part of their fees requests in the initial recommendations.

Parker Lemke

The Student Services Fees Committee released its initial funding recommendations for administrative units on Monday, responding to more than $56 million in requests from 10 organizations.

While many groups are on track to receive most of their requested fees allocation, some had tens of thousands of dollars of their request left unfunded.

During the student services fees process, two committees — one for student groups and one for larger administrative units — allocate funding to campus organizations.

The fees committee recommended funding only $179,362 of Northrop’s $407,894 request for fiscal year 2016. Northrop’s request was 138 percent higher than what it received last year, a SSFC document said, and the committee said that the increase wasn’t warranted.

The Aurora Center made requests of about $434,000 for the 2016 and 2017 fiscal years. It requested significantly more this year than in the past to cover employee fringe-benefit costs and the addition of a new “Men’s Engagement Coordinator” staff position, according to SSFC documents.

The committee recommended the center receive $286,142 for each year.

The SSFC said the Aurora Center should continue covering fringe benefits using other funds, and that creating the new fees-funded staff position “was not the best approach” to engage men with the center’s programs.

However, the committee’s minority opinion on the Aurora Center’s initial recommendation disagreed with the decision, citing support from the Minnesota Student Association for the position and interest from greek leaders for better male engagement at the center.

The Minnesota Daily, which receives some of its income from student services fees, was recommended to receive $491,824 of its $505,000 request for fiscal year 2016.

The committee said it was happy with the Daily’s technology investments and the reductions made to its print distribution.

Last year, the committee said it was concerned that the Daily’s return rate — the number of newspapers left on stands each day — was too high.