Betty McCollum keeps seat in 4th congressional district

First voted into the seat in 2000, McCollum was the second Minnesota woman to serve in Congress.

Rep. Betty McCollum speaks to a freshman seminar about a bill she is sponsoring to combat world hunger Thursday on the St. Paul campus.

Rep. Betty McCollum speaks to a freshman seminar about a bill she is sponsoring to combat world hunger Thursday on the St. Paul campus.

Minnesota Daily Staff

Democratic incumbent Rep. Betty McCollum won the race for 4th Congressional District, which envelops the University of Minnesota’s St. Paul campus and the Minnesota State Capitol.

With reelection, McCollum will serve a ninth term in the U.S. House of Representatives. As of 12:15 a.m. on Nov. 9, McCollum comfortably led with almost 60 percent of the votes. Her Republican opponent, Greg Ryan, had about 35 percent of the vote with almost 97 percent of precincts reporting.

“You can count on me to stand up for your values, worker’s values, farmer’s values and women’s reproductive rights,” she said at the downtown Minneapolis Hilton in her victory speech late Tuesday night.

First voted into the seat in 2000, McCollum was the second Minnesota woman to serve in Congress.

McCollum serves on several congressional committees, including the Subcommittee on Defense, Interior-Environment Subcommittee and the House Appropriations Committee.

She recently voted to pass the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 and voted in opposition of the trade adjustment assistance (TAA) measure in the Trade Act of 2015.

McCollum supports reducing nuclear proliferation, the effects of climate change and global terrorism.

Two candidates opposed her this year — Ryan and Legal Marijuana Now Party candidate Susan Pendergast Sindt.

Ryan runs a plumbing business in the Twin Cities. He has never held political office.

His main issues included supporting the second amendment, protecting religious liberty, improving healthcare and reforming the tax code.

Pendergast Sindt of Legal Marijuana Now lives in Maplewood, and her campaign was based on helping underprivileged people gain independence. She also pushed for more accessible higher education.