Peeping Tom sought by University police

Jerret Raffety

A 42-year-old woman called police May 25 after discovering an unknown man looking under her stall in a restroom inside the Mayo Building, according to police reports.

The woman described the man as 35 years old with a medium build wearing a light-blue polo shirt and jeans. She told the police the man fled the area immediately in the direction of Coffman Union, but officers did not locate him.

Steve Johnson, deputy police chief for the University Police Department, said there aren’t any suspects currently in custody in relation to the incident.

The safest place to go in situations like this is the most public place possible. In some cases, that can mean leaving the area, he said.

“In a situation like this, number one is to be safe,” Johnson said. “There’s more safety in numbers.”

The next step is to call the police as soon as possible and to try to give a good description of the suspect, Johnson said.

Johnson said there haven’t been any similar reports since.

Traffic arrests

University police arrested two people for driving while under the influence of alcohol last week.

According to police reports, one person was stopped by police after backing into a parked car and another turned the wrong way down a one-way street.

Johnson said DWI arrests are about on pace for this time last year.

So far this year, University police have arrested 64 people for DWIs, compared with 66 DWI arrests at this time last year, he said.

“Drinking and driving is much more expensive than the fine because there are many ramifications as far as insurance costs, suspension of one’s license and resulting transportation costs,” Johnson said.

University police also cited or arrested 12 people for driving with revoked, suspended, cancelled or invalid driver’s licenses or registrations last week.

“The simplest rule for keeping your license or registration valid is following the rules,” Johnson said.

People can avoid the problem by keeping their mailing addresses with the city and the Department of Motor Vehicles up-to-date so they receive notices that their licenses or registration might be suspended, he said.