Man goes for phone, officer goes for gun

The man’s phone was in between his seat and the passenger seat.

Andy Steinke

.What began as a simple traffic stop Friday ended with a University police officer having to draw his gun on a Wisconsin man, according to a University police report.

University police officer Ryan Rivers pulled his gun when Donavon Ferguson, 50, of Springbrook, Wis., made a sudden movement toward him after having turned his back.

Ferguson had grabbed his cell phone from between the driver’s seat and the center console, according to the report.

University Deputy Police Chief Steve Johnson said officers don’t pull their guns often. An officer’s training includes a policy test that challenges his decision-making abilities, Johnson said.

“When this guy turned in his car and reached down into the console area the officer didn’t know what he was going for,” he said. “It could’ve easily been a weapon.”

The incident happened after Rivers pulled Ferguson over for running a red light at 15th Avenue Southeast and University Avenue Southeast.

Ferguson told Rivers he was going the speed limit and said there was nothing he could have done but run the red light.

Rivers asked him for his driver’s license and proof of insurance, but Ferguson ignored Rivers and said he wasn’t speeding.

Rivers told Ferguson again that he was giving him a ticket for running a red light. Ferguson said, “We’ll see about that,” and turned his back on Rivers, according to the report.

Ferguson made a fast movement toward Rivers and Rivers pulled his gun thinking Ferguson had gone for his own gun.

Ferguson has committed several crimes in Wisconsin, according to the report. He was issued a ticket for running a red light and was let go.

Mysterious hole in man’s car near construction zone in St. Paul

A University student who works in a St. Paul campus greenhouse left work to find a five-inch hole in the side of his car, according to a University police report.

Interior design junior Ryan Ellena, was inside the Agronomy/ Plant Genetics Greenhouse for two hours Friday. When he went back to his car he found the hole.

“I can’t get in through the driver’s side door,” Ellena said. “There is an actual hole, it’s not a dent. We’re figuring it was a fork lift.”

According to the report, the damage looked like something sharp had stuck into the body of the car, which might confirm Ellena’s theory.

The area is staged for construction equipment, but no one at the site saw anything, Ellena said.