Game, set and match

“Wimbledon” serves up a refreshing take on romantic comedy

Adrienne Baker

Is it a romantic comedy? Yes. Is it typical? Not altogether.

The movie “Wimbledon” provides the expected outcome but along the way delivers a healthy dose of humor that treats the audience as intelligent and educated adults rather than 15-year-old, Coach-toting, DiCaprio fans.

Professional tennis player Peter Colt (Paul Bettany), after falling to the lower ranks of his sport, goes to Wimbledon on a wildcard. In an attempt to do anything but embarrass himself, he unexpectedly finds a little help from short-tempered Lizzie Bradbury (Kirsten Dunst), a young hotshot in the women’s circuit.

“Wimbledon” delivers surprising comic accuracy that has an audience of men and women between ages 4 and 60 laughing and clapping.

For those who like to swoon, the film is a guaranteed pleasure. Dunst and Bettany have a persuasive chemistry.

If witty humor is more your style, the film’s other characters provide a plethora of entertainment. Colt’s parents, played by Bernard Hill and Eleanor Bron, are the epitome of a stubborn couple. They push each other’s buttons at every turn. the husband moves into the tree house, while his wife intentionally gets caught fooling around with another man.

“Everything I have ever told you is totally bullocks,” the elder Colt tells his son, with a hope-crushing pat on the back.

“Wimbledon” is a light-hearted feel-good movie that touches on the themes of age and sport, and what makes up a person’s worth.

If you do not mind hearing Kristen Dunst affectionately say, “Oh, Peter,” for at least her third film in the last couple of years, then you are likely to connect with some aspect of “Wimbledon,” be the sport, romance or humor.