Up-and-comers at Pitchfork Music Fest: Plants and Animals.

Plants and Animals went straight from their set to an interview with A&E.

Canadian rockers Plants and Animals enjoying a beer after their Sat. afternoon set.

Jules Ameel

Canadian rockers Plants and Animals enjoying a beer after their Sat. afternoon set.

Plants and Animals really like cognac âÄî or at least mentioning it. They probably said the word cognac at least 12 times during the interview. But thereâÄôs nothing wrong with that. After their early afternoon set, the Canada-based band seemed content with sipping 312 beer and discussing just where their sound falls on the spectrum between M. Ward and Queen. A&E argues for the former, but their lush, slow-building arrangements have somehow gotten their brand of rock-folk storytelling compared to the scribes of âÄúFat Bottomed Girls.âÄù Seen any good bands yet? Warren Spicer (vocals, guitar): We got to see Fucked Up. It was pretty amazing. WeâÄôd like to have seen Yeasayer, but weâÄôre going to be gone for our sound check tonight. Matthew Woodley (drums, vocals): I want to see everything. I donâÄôt judge. Would you consider yourself a more hi-fi band? Woodley: Crisp, slick digital. Not lo-fi by any means. Spicer: Sure, itâÄôs hi-fi. ItâÄôs expensive, costs us a lot of money. I heard you guys are into the Québécois [French Canadian] music scene. Nicolas Basque (guitar, bass, vocals): WeâÄôre from Montreal. WhatâÄôs the music scene like there? Woodley: If you throw a snowball âÄî theyâÄôre present year-round âÄî you hit a singer. You guys toured with Born Ruffians and Wolf Parade. WhatâÄôs the main difference between touring with them? Basque: ItâÄôs like playing with Kool-Aid vs. whiskey. Or cognac. Is Born Ruffians Kool-Aid? Woodley: Vodka Kool-Aid. Do you think itâÄôs more challenging getting known in the American music scene than in the Canadian? All around: Yes. Woodley: ItâÄôs easier to be a big fish in a small pond. Spicer: Our national broadcasting company âÄî theyâÄôre kind of like NPR, controlled by the government âÄî it has a lot to do with what goes up. Woodley: ItâÄôs a communist government. If the government likes you, youâÄôre set. I read that you guys got compared to Queen. Basque: ItâÄôs his voice [pointing to Spicer]. I thought you sounded like Fleet Foxes, with a little bit more rock and roll. Woodley: Like Fleet Foxes on cognac. Are you guys big cognac fans? Is that a Canadian thing? Basque: Just Woodley. He likes to compare things to cognac. Woodley: ItâÄôs the highest grade.