Bernie Sanders campaigns for Clinton at University of Minnesota

The former Democratic presidential candidate stopped by the University Tuesday and has future appearances in nearby states.

Sen. Bernie Sanders speaks to a crowd at Northrop Auditorium on Oct. 4, 2016 in support of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

Maddy Fox / Minnesota Daily

Sen. Bernie Sanders speaks to a crowd at Northrop Auditorium on Oct. 4, 2016 in support of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

Olivia Johnson

Sen. Bernie Sanders spoke Tuesday at the University of Minnesota to drum up support for Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign.

Clinton supporters filled Northrop Auditorium for the event, which featured local musician Jeremy Messersmith and speeches from Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges, Minnesota Lt. Gov. Tina Smith and U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison.

The visit by Sanders — who battled Clinton for the Democratic presidential candidate nomination — is part of a series of visits across the country.

Minnesota Student Association President Abeer Syedah also spoke at the rally, commending the college tuition policies developed by Sanders and Clinton and calling for action on social justice issues.

Sanders, who won Minnesota’s Democratic caucus over Clinton by a 62 to 39 percent margin, was greeted with a standing ovation. He gave an energetic speech to the lively crowd, covering issues from women’s rights to free college tuition.

“Let’s focus on the real issues facing the American people,” he said. “[Clinton] understands that it is not acceptable that women are making 79 cents on the dollar compared to men.”

He discussed his and Clinton’s policy on college tuition, garnering cheers from students in the audience.

“Too many people are graduating or leaving college deeply in debt,” he said. “If our economy and our standard of living is going to do well, we need to have the best educated workforce in the world.”

Sanders also has plans to take his “Stronger Together” rally to Des Moines, Iowa and Madison, Wisconsin on Wednesday.

Many student attendees said although they were disappointed Sanders didn’t become the Democratic presidential nominee, they planned to vote for Clinton.

Math and physics senior Johnny Greavu said he thinks it’s extremely important that college students vote in the election.

“I align only slightly less with [Clinton]. She seems like the only candidate who’s equipped. She has the most experience,” he said.

Thomas Pearson, a first-year psychology and sociology student, said he has always been a fan of Sanders and thinks that it’s important for students to vote.

“You can’t just complain,” he said. “It’s really important that everyone gets out there.”