Weber not afraid to take a hit

Sophomore Adam Weber wasn’t at his best but didn’t have much to work with as he was under constant pressure and was sacked a season-high four times Saturday.

Matt Mead

Sophomore Adam Weber wasn’t at his best but didn’t have much to work with as he was under constant pressure and was sacked a season-high four times Saturday.

Minnesota sophomore quarterback Adam Weber isnâÄôt one to shy away from contact. An example: Not once this season has he slid at the end of a run to avoid being hit. Employing that style of play when facing defenders with the general mindset of âÄúkill the quarterbackâÄù assures two things: The hits are going to come and theyâÄôre going to be violent. As a result, Weber has taken his licks, the most recent being a possibly broken, definitely bashed, nose during the GophersâÄô 17-6 win Saturday at Purdue. âÄúThereâÄôs some big boys in there that, when they get their chance at the quarterback, like to give him their best shot,âÄù Weber said. âÄúThey took me down to the ground and my helmet came down on my face.âÄù But the same as every other lick, he didnâÄôt miss a snap. The injury occurred in the middle of MinnesotaâÄôs final scoring drive, a nine-play, 76-yard beauty, capped off by a 9-yard strike from Weber to senior tight end Jack Simmons. âÄúI canâÄôt say enough about Adam Weber,âÄù head coach Tim Brewster said Saturday after the game. âÄúHe was under siege all day, ran the ball, threw the ball, he may have a broken nose right now âĦ IâÄôve got so much admiration for him, his toughness, his courage and his leadership ability.âÄù Two weeks ago, at Illinois, Weber played despite being six days removed from arthroscopic surgery on his right knee to repair a torn meniscus. Weber didnâÄôt even miss a snap when the tear occurred Oct. 5 against Indiana. He couldnâÄôt put weight on his right leg after a third down sack early in the first quarter, but was under center for the GophersâÄô next drive. ItâÄôs easy to see why Brewster used a word like âÄúcourageâÄù in relation to his young quarterback. Brewster visits his roots When it was announced that Tim Brewster would be the new head coach of the Minnesota football team, the general reaction from Gophers fans was âÄúWho?âÄù Brewster wasnâÄôt new to the coaching world; heâÄôd been a coach in some capacity since 1986. The majority of those years were spent as a tight ends coach at the likes of North Carolina and Texas. His most recent jobs were in the NFL, with San Diego and Denver. But the last, and only, head coaching position he held before taking the reins at Minnesota was at a tiny high school in Lafayette, Ind. ItâÄôs a far cry from where he is now, but Brewster hasnâÄôt forgotten his brief tenure at Central Catholic High School. His Gophers played in West Lafayette Saturday, so the second-year coach drove to his old home Friday night. Brewster had 23 players on his varsity team; there were only 97 students in four grades at the school. He said he remembers it well and still has fond memories from Central Catholic. âÄúIt was very nostalgic for me,âÄù Brewster said. âÄúVery emotional for me.âÄù