Queer Takes takes on families

The Walker’s newest rendition of their Queer Takes festival examines alternative families.

An image from “Beautiful Darling: The Life and Times of Candy Darling, Andy Warhol”
PHOTO COURTESY THE WALKER ART CENTER

An image from “Beautiful Darling: The Life and Times of Candy Darling, Andy Warhol” PHOTO COURTESY THE WALKER ART CENTER

Mark Brenden

WHAT: Queer Takes: Alt Families WHEN: âÄúBeautiful Darling: The Life and Times of Candy Darling, Andy Warhol Superstar,âÄù June 4, 7:30 p.m. âÄúEdie and Thea: A Very Long Engagement,âÄù June 10, 7:30 p.m. âÄúGoing South (Plein Sud),âÄù June 11, 7:30 p.m. WHERE: Walker Art Center, 1750 Hennepin Ave., Mpls. Oftentimes when homosexuals are unable to get their biological families to accept their true selves, they end up forging new (likely better) families. âÄúQueer Takes: Alt Families,âÄù the WalkerâÄôs newest showcase, provides real, pertinent examples of these scenarios. The three-film festival takes place over a week at the Walker Art Center, with pretty camera angles and poignant storytelling to boot. âÄúBeautiful Darling: The Life and Times of Candy Darling, Andy Warhol SuperstarâÄù âÄúCandy came from out on the island / In the backroom she was everybodyâÄôs darling / But she never lost her head / Even when she was giving head / She said, âÄòHey babe, take a walk on the wild side.âÄô âÄù Though she was immortalized in these lyrics from Lou ReedâÄôs epochal Warhol Factory time capsule âÄúWalk on the Wild Side ,âÄù such a strange and illustrious life as Candy DarlingâÄôs certainly requires more than a verse in a song. âÄúBeautiful Darling,âÄù from director James Rasin, fills that void with his hard-hitting documentary. In a terrific and encompassing juxtaposition of CandyâÄôs life, the film starts with a broken-back blue collar workday scene and quickly cuts to a laughing lady in pasty-white makeup. Candy was Jimmy Slattery , an outcast boy in a potato-field small town in New York state in the uniformity of the 1950s, desiring only to be a female movie star. Turns out her ambitions were in the right place. She became everything she dreamed of, starring in Warhol movies and a Tennessee Williams play, being the center of attention at A-list parties and escaping the small town from which she came. After her death, her family renounced her and her longtime partner. Desperate admirer Jeremiah Newton , producer of the documentary, worked to preserve the legacy of the charismatic actress who caught the eye of such âÄô60s big wigs as Warhol, Williams and John Waters. âÄúGoing South (Plein Sud)âÄù This French road film by Sébastien Lifshitz (âÄúWild SideâÄù) is as mysterious as it is adventurous. The bold and visually pretty sojourn of a brother and sister who thumb a ride to the south of France with a handsome driver with a secret forces the three, each with familial complexities, to find resolution along the way. âÄúEdie and Thea: A Very Long EngagementâÄù Directed by Greta Olafsdottir and Susan Muska (âÄúThe Brandon Teena StoryâÄù), âÄúEdie and TheaâÄù is a film that takes on the great civil rights issue of our time. The story of Edie Winsor and Thea Spyer, a New York couple of 43 years, shows the coupleâÄôs struggle as they long for the acceptance that would come through marriage. Affectionate, spry and humbling, this film serves as a microcosm of the era-defining struggle for acceptance for gay couples in the U.S.