Click with caution

While the Internet can be convenient, it’s also changing our social lives and the way we think.

Editorial board

In our fast-paced society, itâÄôs important to stop for a moment and take a look at what our multi-tasking habits may be doing to us. While the Internet has numerous benefits, it has also changed the way we as humans think and process information. Our changed brains are not necessarily worse, but they are different.

Constant access to the Internet and to others has our society continuously connected. Today, we have to worry about checking Facebook, Twitter, email, Tumblr and text messages. People are hooked to the web, which allows easy access to other people but at the same time creates stress and anxiety âÄî our attention is constantly strained.

Students commonly multitask while studying. If the homework requires a laptop, the access to everyone else through social networking is too tempting to resist. With Facebook, YouTube, cell phones and TVs distracting students, it creates an extremely difficult atmosphere to concentrate in.

People want information fast and to the point. We want our news quickly. This has changed our calm, focused minds. Nicholas Carr notes in his book âÄúThe ShallowsâÄù that itâÄôs difficult for people to sit down and read a large chunk of a book for class now because of technology. Even Carr himself said he isnâÄôt able to concentrate on reading books anymore, and itâÄôs because of the fast-paced Internet world.

We now think differently and have different habits because of technological advancements, and we should be wary of its consequences. ItâÄôs important to live in the real world and experience life outside of the laptop. ItâÄôs important to have real interactions with other people, without computer mediation.

This week is National Green Week âÄî the perfect chance to take a day to unplug from your technology.