Student finds urine-soaked underwear drawer

Britt Johnsen

First-year student Megan Kehrer thought she was going to go about a normal night and take a shower but instead discovered an unusual crime in her underwear drawer.

Kehrer said that around 11 p.m. Monday she found urine all over her underwear when she reached in her drawer to get a clean pair.

“I thought it was water, but it was urine,” Kehrer said.

Kehrer said she keeps the door to her Centennial Hall dorm room locked at all times.

However, Kehrer said she suspects the perpetrator might be a former roommate who moved out in September – the only person who might have a key.

Kehrer now lives alone and said her roommate lived in Centennial Hall for an extended stay, which allows students who apply for on-campus housing to have a temporary place to live until they find a permanent residence.

Kehrer said no damage was done other than having to wash the more than 20 garments in her drawer, but she said the incident made her want to live alone next semester.

“If someone else has a key, I don’t have control,” Kehrer said. “It’s scary that someone was in your room and you don’t know who it was.”

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Elsewhere on campus, underage students still have problems with drinking.

Police reported 32 incidents last week, one involving a 17-year-old found passed out and unresponsive in a Centennial Hall hallway.

He had a 0.11 blood alcohol content and was transported to Hennepin County Medical Center. Centennial Hall employees would not comment on the incident.

A student and another individual got into a fight after drinking alcohol last week in Comstock Hall.

Wachen Anderson, Judicial Affairs coordinator, would not comment on whether alcohol caused the fight, but she said fights in residence halls are not rare.

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Theft was also a problem on campus last week, with 15 reported bicycle thefts.

Several students said they are aware bike theft occurs, so they take extra precautions when locking their bikes.

“You’re always at risk for bike theft,” sophomore Chris Estee said.

Eight other thefts were reported on campus, mostly wallets and backpacks.

Some students who had items stolen, however, said it has forever changed their habits.

Graduate student Ogu Okany had $40 stolen from his wallet two years ago from his desk in the teaching assistants’ office of the Rarig Center.

Since then, he said, office employees have kept a better eye on their belongings and lock doors at all times.

“(Theft) makes us more aware of our stuff and the fact that (an) office is not secure,” Okany said.

Other students said they have never had anything stolen at the University but said awareness of their surroundings and watching their belongings is something all students should do.

“I usually keep all my stuff with me,” senior Sarah Westman said. “I’m not afraid to chase someone down if they steal my stuff.”