President Obama

Barack Obama, left, takes the oath of office from Chief Justice John Roberts, not seen, as his wife Michelle, holds the Lincoln Bible and daughters Sasha, right and Malia, watch at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2009. (AP Photo/Chuck Kennedy, Pool)

Ashley Goetz

Barack Obama, left, takes the oath of office from Chief Justice John Roberts, not seen, as his wife Michelle, holds the Lincoln Bible and daughters Sasha, right and Malia, watch at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2009. (AP Photo/Chuck Kennedy, Pool)

Barack Hussein Obama was sworn in as the 44th president of the United States Tuesday as more than a million frozen spectators packed the U.S. Capitol to witness the spectacle. Countless others from around the world tuned in to watch the nationâÄôs first black president give a stirring inaugural speech âÄî which stressed determination and faith in American ideals. âÄúAt these moments, America has carried on not simply because of the skill or vision of those in high office, but because We the People have remained faithful to the ideals of our forebearers, and true to our founding documents,âÄù he said. Obama also said the nation had many real challenges that had been ignored for too long. âÄúOur nation is at war, against a far-reaching network of violence and hatred,âÄù Obama said. âÄúOur economy is badly weakened, a consequence of greed and irresponsibility on the part of some, but also our collective failure to make hard choices and prepare the nation for a new age.âÄù

To view the inauguration slideshow, click here.

But much like his campaign, ObamaâÄôs speech was rich with hope. âÄúOn this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of purpose over conflict and discord,âÄù Obama said. To conclude his speech, Obama likened the countryâÄôs struggles to some of the most trying moments of the Revolutionary War, the moments just before George Washington crossed the Delaware River in the winter of 1776. âÄúWith hope and virtue, let us brave once more the icy currents and endure what storms may come,âÄù he said. âÄúLet it be said by our children’s children that when we were tested, we refused to let this journey end, that we did not turn back, nor did we falter; and with eyes fixed on the horizon and God’s grace upon us, we carried forth that great gift of freedom and delivered it safely to future generations.âÄù — Ian Power contributed to this report from Washington, D.C.