University of Minnesota Board of Regents finalists narrowed to 12

The candidates were chosen from a pool of 17 after three days of interviews earlier this month.

Kevin Beckman

The list of candidates vying for a seat on the University of Minnesota’s Board of Regents has been narrowed to 12 after three days of interviews.

The 12 finalists, which include three current regents, the CEO of General Mills, a former Gophers and Green Bay Packers football player and a Twin Cities radiologist, among others, are competing to fill four seats on the board. The Regent Candidate Advisory Council — the body that screens and recommends candidates — released its recommendations Jan. 6.

The council received 36 applications, choosing 17 to be interviewed earlier this month, before narrowing down the field to 12.

Seats from three legislative districts and one at-large seat are at stake in this year’s election.

A joint legislative committee will select one candidate for each vacant seat to forward to the Minnesota Legislature.

The full state Legislature then elects regents during a joint session. Candidates not selected, considered or forwarded by the RCAC, or chosen by the legislative committee, can still be nominated by a legislator for potential election to the board.

Finalists for the state’s second district are Ian Benson, Jim Carter and Sandra Krebsbach.

The state’s third district finalists include Walter Erickson, Tammy Lee Stanoch and incumbents Thomas Devine and Darrin Rosha.

Current board Vice Chair David McMillan and Curtis Teberg will compete in the state’s eighth district.

Kent Molde, Kendall Powell, John Regal and Devine are up for consideration for the at-large position.

Because of redistricting, Devine — incumbent second congressional district regent — now resides in the third congressional district, and the RCAC opted to recommend him as a candidate for both the third district and the at-large seat.

RCAC chair Ardell Brede thanked all 36 applicants in a statement, saying the Council is confident the University will be well-served by the elected regents.

“The willingness of these people to give of their time, talent and energy to serve the University and the state as a regent speaks well of them as individuals and shows that the governing board of the University attracts people who are well-credentialed, experienced and interested in serving,” the statement said.