The Republicans are In control—now what?

The Supreme Court is still short a justice.

Kaylee Anderson

So, Donald Trump is now our President-elect — the words are difficult to write because they feel unreal, but they’re true. Before the election, a few republicans had suggested keeping the ninth seat on the Supreme Court vacant if Hillary Clinton were to win the election, indefinitely blocking any attempt to appoint a new judge.

Now, with two of the three branches of government soon to be controlled entirely by the Republicans, it won’t be long before they change their tune.

Personally, I’m curious to see how Donald Trump handles appointing a new justice to the Supreme Court. Many are skeptical of Trump’s ability to lead America, perhaps believing he will put our country in a perpetual choke-hold with his dramatics, but thankfully his tiny hands probably won’t do that much damage. He has already managed to backpedal on one of the key points of his campaign after his victory on November 11, saying that instead of repealing Obamacare, he’s considering keeping parts of the legislation intact.

Keeping in mind Donald Trump’s inherent ability to flip-flop on positions, who knows what will happen with Merrick Garland, President Obama’s Supreme Court nominee. Part of Garland’s appeal is that both parties have spoken in praise of him, showing that despite the polar opposite political positions of government officials, there are still ways we can span the gap.

Regardless of who Trump appoints, the country will likely remain heavily divided. Even with the Republicans in control of many facets of our government, Democrats and third-party voters still have voices that need to be heard. Much may not be accomplished in terms of social progress in the next four years, but hopefully we don’t fall off the mountain of justice with this appointment.