Students camp out for Dylan tickets

students waiting outside of northrup for bob Dylan tickets to go on sale at 10am

Ali Haupt

students waiting outside of northrup for bob Dylan tickets to go on sale at 10am

A night doesnâÄôt typically include sleeping outside on cement with only your backpack as a pillow, but for senior Markien Skirnyk and junior Adam Campbell , that was exactly what Thursday night was like. Both Skirnyk and Campbell spent the night outside Northrop Auditorium and were the first in line to purchase Bob Dylan concert tickets that went on sale for students Friday at 10 a.m. âÄúWe didnâÄôt plan too well,âÄù Skirnyk said Friday morning about their lack of real pillows or blankets. Other people in line were more prepared. One group even had the foresight to bring a tent. Most people, however, such as first-year students Eileen Sorensen and Laura Galarneau, had only blankets and warm coats. âÄúWe got here at around 10 p.m. and slept on the concrete,âÄù Sorensen said. For Jason Beierle, a political science senior who got in line at 12:15 a.m. Friday , a lawn chair was more comfortable than the sidewalk. âÄúI slept on the concrete for a few hours,âÄù he said, but by Friday morning he was back to sitting in his chair. People who werenâÄôt able to sleep in the line found activities to keep them entertained. Skirnyk and Campbell played cards and people-watched, they said. But the highlight of their night was meeting Robin Williams , who performed Thursday at Northrop. âÄúWe met him at around 10 p.m. after he performed. We took pictures and got his autograph,âÄù Skirnyk said. Other people enjoyed a Dylan sing-a-long with people who had brought musical instruments. Sophomore Sam Tornio played a guitar for the sing-a-long. âÄúWe shared guitars and played Bob Dylan songs and songs weâÄôd written,âÄù Tornio said. âÄúA lot of people came by just to hang out,âÄù said marketing junior Zach Hay , who was waiting for tickets. The music continued into the morning, as did the waiting, with a CD player setting the mood with DylanâÄôs songs. At 10 a.m., the ticket office opened to sell 500 tickets, which were available only to students. By Friday at 3 p.m., only 80 were left, Cari Hatcher, the director of marketing and publicity for Northrop, said. The box office closed at 5 p.m. Friday. The tickets were part of a special student pre-sale, and with those gone, fans who want to attend DylanâÄôs first concert at the University will have to wait for the general public tickets to go on sale next week âÄî at full price. The concert will be at 8 p.m. on Election Day, Nov. 4. Music Professor Alex Lubet, who has taught about Dylan in some of his courses, said the concert will be âÄúhugely symbolicâÄù both because Dylan has never played at the University before and because the concert will be on election night. Lubet also said the concert is significant because Dylan has made comments this year in support of Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama. âÄúItâÄôs been years since he was politically engaged,âÄù he said. While Lubet said he doesnâÄôt want to speculate on DylanâÄôs motives, he said Dylan likes to surprise people. âÄúHeâÄôs one of the most prolific performers in popular music; heâÄôs always looking for something interesting to do,âÄù he said. Lubet added that Dylan enjoys being in his home state âÄî contrary to some popular opinion. âÄúDylan loves Minnesota, he spends more time in Minnesota than any other place,âÄù he said. Lubet also said the concert could act as a reward for the âÄúcivic-mindedâÄù people of Minnesota who will vote on Nov. 4. âÄúDylan is one of the great musicians of our time and is a point of pride in Minnesota,âÄù he said.