Famed violinist to play U students’ work

Irvine Arditti will play music students’ compositions as a part of a series of performances on campus this weekend.

 Graduate students Schuyler Tsuda, far left, Colin Holter, Jeremy Wagner, and Mike Duffy wrote compositions for violinist Irvine Arditti, who will be performing on campus Friday and Sunday.

Graduate students Schuyler Tsuda, far left, Colin Holter, Jeremy Wagner, and Mike Duffy wrote compositions for violinist Irvine Arditti, who will be performing on campus Friday and Sunday.

Katherine Lymn

When University of Minnesota graduate music student Jeremy Wagner began work on his composition for world-renowned violinist Irvine Arditti , he did not go easy on him. âÄú[Arditti] can do the impossible,âÄù said the student composer. âÄúI didnâÄôt want to give him something that was too simple.âÄù Wagner is one of four University of Minnesota graduate students composing a piece that will be played Friday by the violin virtuoso. The students, working with music professors, have each written a piece for Arditti, whom they have admired from a young age. The students worked with music professor James Dillon on the compositions, which vary from four minutes to 12 minutes in length. The music was sent to Arditti last month. Dillon came to the University from London approximately three years ago after working as a composer there. The students credited him with convincing Arditti to come to the University. âÄúI phoned him up,âÄù Dillon said. Getting Arditti to agree to play wasnâÄôt too hard for Dillon âÄî he and the violinist have known each other for 25 years. The students and Dillon learned late this summer that Arditti was coming to campus and have been working on their pieces since before then. Graduate student Colin Holter already had a piece in mind, but it was written for viola so he had to adapt it for Arditti to play. âÄúYouâÄôve got to seize the opportunity,âÄù Holter said. Dillon said he notices âÄúa lot of untapped potentialâÄù at the UniversityâÄôs music school. FridayâÄôs performance could serve as inspiration to current music students, he said. âÄúIâÄôm hoping itâÄôs something that will rub off,âÄù Dillon said. The graduate students were unanimous in their enthusiasm for the show, and for what they hope other students get out of it. âÄúPart of what it is is just realizing there are these possibilities,âÄù said student composer Mike Duffy . âÄúJust to be excited about music is the most wonderful thing.âÄù ArdittiâÄôs Friday performance of the studentsâÄô compositions is the first in a series of appearances on campus. In a Sunday concert, Arditti will play with pianist and visiting University professor Noriko Kawai . The violinist will hold a public class Monday afternoon before returning to the United Kingdom. Money for ArdittiâÄôs fees came from the UniversityâÄôs Collaborative Arts Program , the School of Music and the Institute for Global Studies , Dillon said. Dillon said he hopes to see more composer-performer collaborations, especially with student involvement, in the future. âÄúThis is only the beginning,âÄù he said.