U students tap into job market

The job market has improved because of economic recovery in 2002.

Eddie Glenn

University student Adrienne Houghton will graduate this spring with an advertising and communications degree but does not have a job waiting for her.

She said she does not want to rush into a job because she wants to find a career that is exactly what she wants.

“My resume is pretty much bulletproof,” she said.

Some University staff members and students said the job market is the best it’s been in years.

Morgan Kinross-Wright is a departmental director in the Undergraduate Business Career Center in the Carlson School of Management. She said the job market is great because of the economic recovery since 2002.

“Everything is available for graduates, especially accounting, finance, management and sales,” she said.

The Carlson School is “always looking for new relationships” with companies that could help students find jobs, she said.

Erica Fischer, graduating with a degree in political science and journalism, is an intern in the Twin Cities office of Sen. Norm Coleman, R-Minn. She said she hopes the internship will turn into a full-time job.

A serious job search usually takes approximately six months, she said, so she feels comfortable working her internship and circulating her resume. Fischer said she is patient about finding a job.

“I’ll take my time and find something I really love,” she said.

Fischer said she has long-term goals of working in Washington as a press secretary for a member of Congress. She does much of her networking in a dean’s office.

“It’s hard to find a job without some professional experience,” she said.

Her job in the dean’s office brought her valuable experience working in a professional setting, she said.

University pharmacy student Scott Larson is beginning residency at the Hennepin County Medical Center.

“(The) University was very helpful – also the field has such a high demand,” Larson said.

Students are guaranteed a position right out of the College of Pharmacy, he said. He found his residency during a 52-week rotation. All pharmacy students go through rotations in their last year of school, working at different hospitals to find an environment they like.

Rotations are where the job opportunities are found, Larson said.

“You make connections with people you normally wouldn’t meet,” he said.

Larson said that he plans to continue his residency until a clinical position opens. He hopes to work in a rural hospital, he said.

Sarah Hambor is graduating after three years as an advertising student. Hambor said she has bought a house with her fiance and is “a little stressed” about paying the mortgage.

She said she has a job secured at T-Mobile as a sales representative. She found the job at a job fair earlier this year at the Minneapolis Convention Center.

Hambor said she might go back to school and get her master’s degree in business administration. She hopes to eventually have a corporate position, she said.

Clare Foley is a departmental director for the career center in the Carlson School.

She said completing graduate school will offer students higher-level jobs with higher salaries, but the market is great for all graduates.

“We hope the economy will continue to rise,” she said.

But she said it is impossible to predict how the job market will look next year.