Como burglar settles for a soda

Also, a fraternity house returned from break to find three laptops missing.

Luke Feuerherm

Minutes after smashing in the window at Planet Beach on Como Avenue early Monday morning, a burglar dressed in grey and black rummaged through the cash register before leaving with his only loot âÄî a cold Coca-Cola from the spaâÄôs pop machine.
Surveillance video captured the 3-minute break-in at about 2:45 a.m. after the spa had closed for the night, according to the police report.
Planet Beach management declined to comment on the burglary.
After securing the soda, the footage shows the man get away in a dark-colored minivan, according to the report.
Officers called to the spa found the front door window smashed open.
âÄúA lot of times people will do whatever it takes to get in,âÄù Minneapolis police Sgt. Steve McCarty said, âÄúwhether that means prying the door open or breaking out a window to get inside.âÄù
Police currently have no suspects in the pop heist.
Fraternities left vulnerable over break
After returning from spring break, three members of the Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity (FIJI) noticed their laptops had been stolen.
As the University Avenue house was locked up during break, members of the fraternity suspect the thief gained access through a second-floor window, FIJI President Marco Pavoloni said.
âÄúWeâÄôre fixing [the windows] so the house will be pretty much impossible to break into next break,âÄù Pavoloni said. âÄúWeâÄôre taking all of the possible precautions so this never happens again.âÄù
After the break-in, members took a look around the house but could not find any signs of forced entry.
Pavoloni said no one was staying in the house over break, but some members who were still around town had been checking in periodically.
While members of the fraternity were surprised to return and find their laptops missing, Pavoloni said itâÄôs not rare for fraternities to be targeted over long breaks.
âÄúItâÄôs something thatâÄôs been really common,âÄù he said. âÄúI think that fraternity houses are targeted over vacations âĦ ItâÄôs unfortunate.âÄù
The University of MinnesotaâÄôs Office for Fraternity and Sorority Life could not be reached for comment.
McCarty said itâÄôs unusual for burglars to target houses with a lot of residents.
âÄúIt is more risky to break into a multi-room dwelling like that,âÄù McCarty said. âÄúYou donâÄôt know who will be there and who wonâÄôt.âÄù
McCarty recommended residents of any house, including fraternities and sororities, with vacation plans notify local precincts of when they plan to go out of town so patrol officers know what areas need additional attention.