Editorial: Go vote in the Minneapolis election on Nov. 7

Daily Editorial Board

Last week, we endorsed a series of candidates for mayor of Minneapolis as well as many city council positions that affect the vast student body on campus. Our ballot choices reflected the priorities and discussions of the Daily’s editorial board on who should be responsible to lead our city. While there is certainly disagreement on who should be accountable to lead Minneapolis moving forward, there certainly is no disagreement that all capable residents should make their voice heard in the upcoming election on Tuesday, Nov. 7. 

It’s important for everyone to realize how important this election is, whether they subscribe to the status quo or are passionate for revolutionary change. For mayor, there are 16 candidates that may appear to advocate for similar policies, but distinguish themselves in the understanding of nuance in local politics. During this election, there has been immense debate on how to address skyrocketing housing prices — should we push hard for rent control, a policy that will necessitate legislative backing, or should we provide lucrative benefits for housing developers? Another critical issue of police reform has emerged as a centerpiece for many campaign platforms. Some argue that the number of police officers needs to be reduced and the officers demilitarized. Others argue that in fact our city needs more officers — warranted by the clear lack of flexibility of many officers to do their job and the lack of diversity in the police force that represents Minneapolis.

We urge all readers to first get educated on the election platforms of the candidates in question, and not simply vote based on familiarity to name or publicity. Everyone should understand the depth of many issues facing Minneapolis, and gain a thorough understanding on what each candidate has done to improve upon issues that matter to them. We also urge voters to think critically about the future of the city, and carefully evaluate the proposed solutions to many problems by candidates across the pool. Furthermore, we urge faculty members and University staff to permit students to exercise this civic duty. No students should face obstacles in order to exercise this right. 

If everyone actively engaged in this process, we will be able to elect representatives that represent the true interests of Minneapolis, and direction the city needs to go in. It is this component of our government which allows our city to continue improving upon the progress already made. It is this right and responsibility of the constituency that permits the foundation of democracy to be strengthened at the most critical and closest level of governance.