Multicultural Greek Council welcomes new chapter

Asian-interest sorority Sigma Psi Zeta announced its campus arrival.

Sarah Connor

Changes are underway for the University of Minnesota’s Multicultural Greek Council, as its recently elected leaders were joined by a new sorority Sunday night.

Brandon Bogan, one of four executive board members nominated and elected earlier this month, will take over the Multicultural Greek Council and its expanded eight chapters in January.

His council added Sigma Psi Zeta — a national, Asian-interest sorority — which will join the University’s other culture-specific greek organizations, including Latina and South Asian sororities and a gay, bisexual, progressive fraternity.

Bogan, an anthropology junior, said he will focus on enhancing the council’s campus presence and strengthening bonds within the small but growing community during his upcoming presidency.

“One of the hardest things that we deal with is not having our name out there and having to build awareness of us,” Bogan said.

He served as MGC’s secretary last year and said he wants to continue the council’s mission of providing a community for multicultural greek organizations.

“I want to build on the platform that we created this past year,” he said. “I think we can make MGC into something that people look toward.”

Bogan said he hopes to plan an all-greek event for MGC’s members, similar to events held by the Minnesota International Student Association, like the International Bazaar it hosted last week.

“My biggest goal is fostering a tighter knit community within MGC,” he said. “If people in different organizations who don’t normally talk to each other are hanging out and having a good time together, then I know I’m doing a good job.”

MGC’s adviser Mia McCurdy said because the group is still trying to expand, Bogan’s past leadership experience will benefit him in his new position, adding that his re-election to the board is a vote of confidence from chapter members.

“I think that just shows the level of commitment [he has], and the level of trust the community has,” she said.

In order to grow MGC’s numbers, Bogan said he plans to reach out to incoming freshmen before they arrive on campus.

He also hopes to grab the attention of potential new members next fall with a kick-off event.

“I want to be able to say, ‘Hey, this is what it’s like to be in greek [organizations]’ — but one that’s not often portrayed in the media,” he said.

Bogan said he also wants to boost MGC’s growth by fostering relationships with established campus organizations like the Interfraternity Council and the Panhellenic Council.

“We are all already a family; we are all already part of a community. And that’s something that we should keep building upon,” he said.

McCurdy said while she is proud of previous executive board achievements, she’s excited to see where the new team of four leaders will take the multicultural greek organization.

“I’m most proud of the sense of community they’ve built,” she said. “I think we still have a long way to go, but I wouldn’t have imagined that we’d be as far as we are already.”

She said she hopes to see this year’s executive board maintain past progress.

“Last year was such a great year, but it takes more than one great year to build a sustainable, consistent presence,” McCurdy said.